Archive for the ‘Natural’ Category

Cucumbers Can Help Fight Bad Breath!

Monday, November 30th, 2009

cucumbers bad breath

This just in! As we have discussed before, there are various vegetables that can help stop bad breath. However, we have never discussed cucumbers stopping bad breath. That’s right– not only does a cucumber have Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B3, Vitamin B5, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, Folic Acid, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium and Zinc, but it also has properties that can combat halitosis.

Here’s what you can do: take a piece of cucumber, hold it to the roof of your mouth with your tongue for 30 seconds to cure halitosis. The phytochemicals in the cucumber will help kill the anaerobic bacteria that cause bad breath.

1 Comment »

Aromatherapy: Bad Breath & Halitosis Cure

Thursday, October 22nd, 2009

aromatherapy bad breath
As we all know, bad breath (halitosis) is a socially embarrassing issue, with a huge list of causes: everything from dry mouth, oral decay, medicines, excessive smoking, dentures, and gum disease. Luckily, as a problem with many causes, there are also many cures.

Many remedies have been tested for stopping halitosis, most of which are temporary. The best way to tackle bad breath for the long haul is to target the underlying cause. This can be done by improving oral hygiene, getting rid of gum/periodontal disease, and having oral fixtures removed. Aromatherapy is yet another cure for bad breath. Yes, another home treatment! The effects of aromatic essential oils tend to be longer-lasting. The use of it as a bad breath remedy is increasing throughout the world, since it has other benefits on top of halting halitosis.

Essential Oils & Bad Breath

Even though essential oils are taken from plants, they can be toxic when ingested, depending on which one you use and how much of it. It is recommended that one should confer with a doctor prior to using essential oils, so that one can find the essential oil that is most suitable. Some should also be diluted prior to use, like tea tree oil. Tea tree oil is anti-bacterial, and can be used to kill the bad breath-causing bacteria in the oral cavity.

In our toothpastes and mouthwashes, one may find that peppermint and fennel essential oils are commonly used. One can also create his or her own mouthwashes with these oils, depending on how much one knows about these oils. For instance, one can mix tea tree oil with warm water and rinse the mouth out twice a day with it. For a fast treatment, one can use a drop of peppermint oil on the tongue and hold it for a few minutes. Spearmint, lavender, cardamom and almond essential oils are also used to cure bad breath.

9 Comments »

Apple Cider Vinegar Can Cure Bad Breath!

Wednesday, October 21st, 2009

apple cider vinegar

According to sources, it can be quite beneficial for those with halitosis to drink a little bit of apple cider vinegar each day (preferably  mixed with something else, due to the taste).  The benefits that you reap depend on how dedicated you are to your health, since not everyone can handle drinking this. 

Apple cider vinegar is actually a natural anti-bacterial agent and it contains potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorous, chlorine, sodium, sulfur, copper, iron, silicon and fluorine, all of which the human body need. It is created by crushing fresh apples and having them mature in wooden barrels. The fermentation properties of the apples are accelerated. When vinegar matures, it has a dark web-like bacterial foam called “mother”. Natural vinegars that have the “mother” have nutrients that vinegars available in stores do not have, so it is recommended that you get Natural Apple Cider Vinegar (with an average pH level of 5-7).

Since apple cider vinegar has acidic properties, it actually serves as a bad breath / halitosis cure. It also helps with the following ailments: sinus infections, sore throats, high cholesterol, skin conditions, food poisoning, allergies (in both humans and animals), immune system problems, muscle fatigue after exercising, metabolism issues, constipation, arthritis, gout, bladder stones, and urinary tract infections.

1 Comment »

Probiotics Serving New Functions in Different Markets

Tuesday, October 13th, 2009

probiotics

Many people are beginning to understand with probiotics that not all bacteria are bad.  In fact, probiotics have been contributing to good health for years. With an increasing demand of probiotics, people are requesting that they be available in forms other than yogurt and oral dietary supplements.  Consumers want more choices, since some people are sensitive to certain kinds of processing (i.e. temperature).  However, with constantly-improving technology, probiotics are being used in a broader market of goods.

The thought of beneficial bacteria has become more popular with the public, since studies have shown that probiotics can aid the immune system in the fight against the “bad guys”.  More and more yogurt brands are boasting probiotics on their labels, and companies are continuing to find ways to implement good bacteria strains into other foods that are not cultured by tradition.  This doesn’t necessarily mean a consumer will purchase this product, since a company tried adding probiotics to cheese, and this product didn’t sell too well.  This is because a consumer is not generally looking for cheese to add health benefits to a meal; instead, he or she usually uses cheese to add taste to what is being eaten.

People tend to be the most comfortable with probiotics being added to oral health care products, since strains of bad bacteria reside in the mouth, gums and teeth, and these bacteria can cause tooth enamel and gum disease.  Two of the most popular products that have received a high increase in growth are gums and mints, since functional gum has jumped 10% between 2007-2008.  A current trend in consumer education is people learning about the role that good strains of bacteria have in staying healthy and recovering one’s health. 

Streptococcus mutans is one of the Lactobacillus strains that work against enamel-eroding bacteria, and people can expect this strain to appear in gums and mints.  A sugar-free gum that came out recently contains the strain Lactobacillus reuteri, and there are mints that contain a mixture of strains L. reuteri, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosis and L. acidophilus, which target bad breath-causing bacteria.  Another company has developed a breath mint that features Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus uberis, and Streptococcus rattus, all targeted at preventing and fighting dental decay and halitosis.  Surprisingly, there is even a strain of bacteria called Streptococcus oralis that actually has a whitening effect on the teeth, since it crowds out bad bacteria on the teeth’s surface. 

Pharmaceutical companies are creating different probiotic breath mints that will be designed for improving oral health, and lasting much longer than current probiotics without being stored in cold temperatures.  An important thing for manufacturers to remember is that the new oral care products being made need to use bacteria that exist naturally in the oral cavity, otherwise they will not last long in the mouth. 

 There are over 400 different species of bacteria in the digestive, and all of these strains are competing for space to inhabit.  In general, the good bacteria can crowd out the bad bacteria, which is why consuming probiotics can be helpful for those who have diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, lactose indigestion, irritable bowel syndrome, H. pylori (ulcer-causing bacteria) problems, and colon cancer.  It is also worth pointing out that these bacteria exist all over the body, including the mouth, skin, reproductive organs and other membranes.  Ingesting probiotics can even be beneficial for those with allergies, autism, arthritis, and liver and kidney problems.  

One of the major areas for probiotic’s growth in the market may be in immune defense, since probiotics can benefit the immune system’s response.  Immunity is related to gut health, and research has shown that probiotics improve cold and flu symptoms, allergic rhinitis and pollen allergies.  Asia and Europe have already been linking probiotics with immune health for many years, but the U.S. only recently caught on.  Probiotics also are known to prevent certain infections, so it may be useful with epidemics like the swine flu.  Various strains of bacteria have relieved fever symptoms, viral respiratory infections, and pneumonia

Probiotics, especially Lactobacilli, are effective in aiding the immune response and increasing the resistance to pathogens.  Newer territories that researchers are exploring are the effects of probiotics on inflammatory disease, cholesterol reduction and even anti-aging properties, post-myocardial infarction depression and stress management.  Even more surprising, there is groundbreaking research that probiotics can be beneficial in infant formulas, vaginal microbiota, and satiety (for weight management).

 A major challenge in administering probiotics is getting the right dosage, and making sure the correct strains go to the correct places in the body.  It is far from simple, and one of the major challenges that face manufacturers is heat, since it destroys the beneficial flora.  The ingredients in the probiotic supplements must be able to tolerate the handling, storage, processing, shelf-life issues, and the tempestuous environment of the acid in the stomach.  The limited amount of conditions that probiotics can handle seldom allow for applications outside of refrigerated supplements; however, more and more companies are improving the probiotics’ survival, so they are more protected- with longer shelf lives and slower releases.  With new technology constantly being released, some companies have even created a probiotic chocolate, and up and coming probiotic applications in cereal bars, cereals, ice creams, fresh fruit and vegetable juices, meal replacements, and biscuits.  Probiotics in hot tea and soup have even been made possible with these new advances in technology.  Last but not least, topical and personal care applications are now possible with probiotics, since antifungal and antiviral properties can be brought out during a process of fermentation.

 Currently, one of the main trends is pairing probiotics with other probiotics, since this enhances the probiotics’ ability to survive.  With the ever-changing and improving research, technologies and education of probiotics, innovators will continue to deliver new and improved products geared at improving everyone’s health. 

Source: Natural Products Insider

1 Comment »

Mind Your Own Beeswax, Bees Can Cure Bad Breath?

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

Most of us know now that bad breath (halitosis) can be caused by: cavities; dentures; smoking; alcohol; lung, tonsils, adenoid, sinus or throat infections; certain foods (garlic, onions, high sugar products, spicy foods, dairy products); poor oral hygiene; and so on.  We’ve also discussed many different possible cures.  Here are some natural remedies you may not have suspected:

  • Bee Propolis (a resinous mixture that is collected by bees from tree buds and other sources) helps gum infections, as well as other infections.  Obviously, if one is allergic to bees, he or she should not try this method of diffusing bad breath.  Propolis has been used as an antimicrobial, emollient, immunomodulator, dental anti-plaque agent,anti-tumor growth agent, and even in food and musical instruments.
  • Drink water to moisten the mouth, which increases the strength of saliva in the mouth, that cleanses the bad breath bacteria
  • Use a tongue scraper to help remove bacteria
  • Use an odorless form of garlic, which is a natural antiobiotic
  • Zinc also has an antibacterial effect
  • Add half a lemon to a glass a water, and gargle with it
  • When brushing the gums and tongue, use powdered cloves, an herbal remedy for bad breath.  One can keep cloves under the molars without chewing to help maintain fresh breath.
  • Avoid foods like blue cheese, salami, curry, tuna, garlic, onions, anchovies, red meat, milk, coffee, cola, etc.
  • Parsley is a natural deodorizer
  • Cardamom is a breath sweetener
  • Cranberries help fight off the bad breath-causing bacteria
  • Eating a green/raw Guava will help stop bad breath
  • Fruits that are high in Vitamin C, like citrus and oranges, will help control the bad bacteria
  • Eucalyptus Oil is found in many toothpastes and other oral products because it has an active antiseptic ingredient, Eucalyptol
  • Sometimes chewing on sugarless gum or eating sugarless candies will help keep the mouth moist and not contribute to the growth of bad oral bacteria
  • Edible camphor helps against bad breath caused by tonsilitis, sinusitis, and head colds, since it is a very effective throat stimulant.  It helps get rid of clogged mucus, making it a natural and effective nasal decongestant.
No Comments Yet »