Archive for the ‘Mouthwash’ Category

Exclusive TheraBreath Tip from Dr. Katz

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

Now that it’s summer and the temperature is rising, try storing your bottle of TheraBreath mouthwash in the refrigerator for an even more refreshing, fresh-breath experience!

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Ingredients in Your Oral Care Products May Hurt More than Help

Friday, March 9th, 2012

Day to day oral care really shouldn’t be rocket science: You brush, floss and rinse twice a day. Seems simple, right? It is to a degree, but it’s important to be aware of what ingredients you are putting in your mouth when you brush your pearly whites. Here are some recent articles that discuss which ingredients to avoid in your oral care products and why.

Many oral care products (especially children’s) such as mouthwash, toothpaste and gum often contain dyes to give them an attractive and bright appearance. There’s nothing wrong with a product wanted to be appealing to eye, right? Well, there might be. According to one article the HealthDay News reports the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will gather a panel of healthcare experts to discuss whether to not these dyes are linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Almost 10 percent of US children from age 4 to 17 have been diagnosed with ADHD according to the Centers to Disease Control and Prevention – that’s roughly 5.4 million youngsters in America alone. The link to ADHD and food dyes has yet to be confirmed, but many health experts already suspect a connection. David Schaub, a psychiatric researcher, professor at Columbia University and FDA panel member told HealthDay News that this pending meeting is “a big step forward” in discussing this issue. While the jury is still out, it’s probably best to stay clear of oral care products that contain dyes to avoid the potential risk of excess dye absorption.

Some people may brush, floss and rinse twice a day but shortly after the deed is done, feel that their bad breath comes back. With good intentions, these same people may purchase and use alcohol-based mouthwashes with mint or cinnamon flavors to cure bad breath. As one article states, while these mouthwashes may mute halitosis for a little while, over time they may actually contribute and cause bad breath. Robin Seymour, as restorative dentist told the UK Daily Mail that some mouthwashes may contain as much as 13 percent of alcohol (by volume). The alcohol in mixed with other natural compounds such as menthol to target oral odor and plaque. While this sounds good in theory, Seymour stated that alcohol dries out the palate and tongue, leaving the anaerobic bacteria that cause bad breath to thrive. With time, the cycle of using an alcohol-based mouthwash, drying out the mouth and having the bacteria multiply may actually make the bad breath bacterial strains more resilient and will allow the microorganisms to thrive in the dry mouth environment. Seymour commented that over time, these types of mouthwashes may stain teeth a pale brown.  Seymour also noted a study that was published in the Dental Journal of Australia that links alcohol-rich mouthwashes to an increased risk of oral cancer.

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TheraBreath’s Specialty Breath Fresheners can Beat Halitosis for Folks of all Body Types

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Halitosis is inevitable, which is one reason why TheraBreath offers such a wide array of breath freshening products. With so many specialty items available, like toothpastes, alcohol-free mouthwashes, mints, lozenges, tongue scrapers, tooth-whitening kits and probiotics, there’s little excuse for suffering through bad breath.

Of course, getting oral odor is unavoidable. With so many bacteria living on your tongue, cheeks and palate, bad breath is a fact of life. What matters is how you deal with it.

At times, it can seem like your mouth goes from fresh to foul faster than you can say “Robin Redbreast’s bad breath” three times. (It’s a tongue twister. Try it.) Are some people more prone to halitosis? Do people of certain health backgrounds or body types get bad breath quicker or more chronically than others? They sure do.

Some folks get more halitosis based on their habits or personal hygiene. So, for example, someone who brushes their teeth once per day is almost certainly more likely to have a stinky mouth than someone who scrubs their teeth two or three times daily. Individuals with an unenthusiastic oral care routine – one that skips the floss, tongue scraper and mouthwash – have themselves to blame for their oral odor. Similarly, people who smoke, drink heavily or eat pungent foods will naturally have bad breath.

Likewise, using an inferior breath product can allow the mouth to develop halitosis more often. For example, alcohol-based mouthwashes can dry out the palate, leaving you more likely to have bad breath, rather than less. This is why TheraBreath recommends using its specialty breath fresheners, since they are specially formulated to neutralize odor and eliminate bacteria.

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To Avoid a Breathalyzer Mix-up, use an Alcohol-free Mouthwash for Your Bad Breath

Monday, February 27th, 2012

So here’s an odd little conundrum: If you’d like to have sweet-smelling breath the next time you’re pulled over, it’s highly advisable that you use mouthwash every day. (After all, you can’t predict when you’ll be stopped by cops, unless you’re planning on speeding.) However, unless you use an alcohol-free mouthwash, there is a chance that your anti-halitosis regimen can land you a DUI charge.

This is true no matter what country you live in, as evidenced by a recent article in the Hong Kong Standard. The piece pointed out that in India, the odds of this happening are especially tilted, since police officers there often use their noses to diagnose drunkenness, rather than utilizing a breathalyzer.

Why would Indian cops use their sniffers instead of a finely calibrated machine?  “If we start checking each of them with sensors, it will lead to traffic snarls on the road,” one officer explained to the news source.

Still, even in the U.S., where breathalyzers set the standard for DUI evidence collection, any driver who doesn’t use a specialty, alcohol-free mouthwash runs the risk, however slight, of getting hauled in for boozing that they didn’t have the pleasure of actually experiencing.

The ability of alcohol-based mouthwashes to register on a breathalyzer is no myth. Studies in journals like the aptly titled Alcohol and Alcoholism show that recent use of an alcohol-based mouthrinse can easily mimic a blood-alcohol content above 0.08.

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TheraBreath’s All-natural Rinse Makes List of Best Mouthwashes for You and for the Environment

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

There are a million mouthwashes out there, and it’s not always easy to differentiate the good from the bad (and the ugly). Fortunately, the Environmental Health Association of Nova Scotia (EHANS) has released a list of products that are healthy and eco-friendly. And wouldn’t you know it, TheraBreath’s oral rinses happened to make the list of the best mouthwashes!

EHANS’s list – somewhat formidably titled the “Guide to Less Toxic Products” – is exactly that: a list of consumer goods that do NOT contain toxins and harmful chemicals. If this makes you stop and wonder about the accuracy of their using the word “toxic,” don’t worry.

They are using it quite correctly.

Believe it or not, many of the substances found in typical, alcohol-based mouthwashes are technically toxic. That is, if these chemicals are swallowed – or more often, swallowed in large enough amounts – they can be quite dangerous. As you might imagine, this means that the best mouthwashes are by definition the all-natural, organic variety!

TheraBreath’s alcohol-free mouthwashes are a case in point. EHANS listed our oral rinses as one of just SEVEN of the best mouthwashes for your health, for the environment and for eliminating bad breath.

Our oral rinses use all-natural ingredients like xylitol, aloe leaf juice, sodium bicarbonate and menthol to quickly and safely eliminate oral odor and kill bacteria.

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