Archive for the ‘halitosis’ Category

National Tooth Fairy Day

Friday, February 21st, 2014

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Get out the wands and dollar bills, because Friday, Feb. 28 is National Tooth Fairy Day.

This holiday celebrates one of children’s favorite visitors. Since losing baby teeth is sometimes a traumatic experience for young children, entering the magical world of the smiling, gift-giving Tooth Fairy helps wash fears away. Whether your child is scared about the pain or what his or her mouth will look like afterward, this is the day to help.

National Tooth Fairy Day marks a great opportunity to share with your kids the importance of keeping your teeth bright and healthy from a young age. Say so long to cavities and bad breath. Studies have shown that how well children take care of their baby teeth often translates into how well they will take care of their teeth as adults.

However, there is one simple, yet frequently overlooked fact: Children’s smiles depend on their parents. Encourage your kids to brush, floss and eat smart every day. Don’t forget about visits to the dentist, either! Working on habits surrounding oral health for kids will give them a head start on a lifetime of picture-perfect teeth.

Four magical tips
So, before parents tuck money under their child’s pillow at night, here are three things they should put to use to keep their kids smiling through the gaps in their teeth – these tips could even save you money on dental treatments down the line.

  • Brush      following the “two-and-two” rule: twice a day for two      minutes each. Most people spend only 46 seconds brushing, according to      Delta Dental. It’s time to step up your child’s game! For youngsters, one      good way to do this is to bring your smartphone or mp3 player into the      bathroom and play their favorite song. Have them brush until the two-minute      mark. For pre-teens, you and your spouse could decide to lengthen      TV-watching privileges or cut down one of their chores for good      oral care habits.
  • Floss      once a day. Though often considered the forgotten middle child of hygiene      routines, flossing is extremely important, since it can dislodge food      particles from nooks that a toothbrush cannot reach. Some dentists find      that flossing before brushing proves to be more effective in      developing the practice into a habit, since after we      brush we sometimes get the false notion that our mouths feel clean      enough, and we will forego flossing.
  • Fun      tip: Demonstrate what flossing does. Please note that it’s a bit messy! In      the kitchen, put on a pair of plastic (kitchen) gloves, then smear peanut      butter, preferably chunky, over one side of your fingers and between them      all the way down to your knuckles. Then, squeezing your fingers together,      have your child try to brush your fingers, which are serving as the      substitute for teeth. Does the toothbrush clean the food stuck between the      fingers? Now, instruct your child to floss between your fingers. A lot      better, right? This exercise will help visualize the power of      flossing.
  • Visit      the dentist once every six months. There doesn’t have be an      issue with your child’s teeth for them to go in. In fact, their      dentist – and tooth fairy – will be more than pleased to see them when      they don’t have problems! If you notice long-lasting halitosis, or bad breath, it may be      a sign of an underlying issue for your child, such as a rotting      tooth. If the tooth finally comes loose, yank it and leave it for the      tooth fairy. Otherwise, consult your dental professional.

On National Tooth Fairy Day, oral health for kids is the shining star. However, putting these habits to use after Friday and throughout the year will ensure your kid will wear a bright, healthy smile for years to come.

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Diets, Bad Breath and Jerry Seinfeld

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

1421738_56683347Jerry Seinfeld might’ve been the star of the award-winning sitcom “Seinfeld,” but he may also know a thing or two about bad breath. When asked which character on the show had the worst oral odor, Jerry responded that some of women he had “dated” on the show had breath that could rival the stench of “the beast.” During intimate scenes when he would get up close to them, the comedian claimed he could notice which actresses had not eaten that day. He explained that this is because when someone has bad breath, often he or she has skipped a meal. Of the actresses who played his girlfriends, most were concerned about their weight, and during the day they wouldn’t eat. Come show time, their mouths produced quite the stink.

True, when people miss meals or are hungry, they tend to come down with halitosis, or bad breath. A major reason is that saliva production decreases in the mouth during this time. When we are chewing foods, saliva acts as a cleanser that rinses out stray bits of food and anaerobic bacteria that contain stinky sulfur compounds. However, as the muscles in the mouth relax while we are not eating, bacteria accumulates, triggering foul breath.  (more…)

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After Telling Miley What’s What, Cher Backs it up with History of Good Oral Health

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

1370587_31342387Even Cher was ragging on Miley Cyrus’ bad breath following the former Disney star’s infamous performance at the MTV VMAs.

Cleaning up that white-coated tongue would not have redeemed Cyrus’ booty-shaking and blurred thighs, but perhaps it would’ve helped.

In an interview with USA Today to promote her new album, Cher spoke her mind.

“I’m not old-fashioned. She could have come out naked, and if she’d just rocked house, I would have said, ‘You go, girl.’ It just wasn’t done well. She can’t dance, her body looked like hell, the song wasn’t great, one cheek was hanging out. And, chick, don’t stick out your tongue if it’s coated.”

Cher is no stranger to scandalous outfits: in fact, some may argue she helped pioneer them. That only made her remarks even more poignant.

The all-star diva has had her fair share of dental work in the past, too. At age 30, she went to the dentist for a routine teeth cleaning, and noticed some teeth shifting. Later she underwent procedures to correct her smile. And now look at her! She has a great teeth and in the 50 years she’s been at it, not one picture quite as smelly as Miley’s has surfaced.

She knows a thing or two about oral health. Through hundreds of interviews and performances, Cher kept it fresh.

So how did she manage?

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Prepare for Summer’s Most Fun Events and Festivals

Monday, August 12th, 2013

1288797_17766700With the summer in full swing and festival season well underway for music fans across the country, there are a few things that die-hard audiophiles can take into consideration when attending the next big event. And what better way to prepare, than to take advice than from the newest release from 1990s grunge rockers, the Pixies? What kind of advice can festival goers take from the tune “Bagboy?” Watch out for halitosis. That’s right – the group’s newest track is about bad breath. Before heading out to the next concert, street fair or festival in your area, take these pointers to make sure the song isn’t directed toward you. As they say, “cover your breath, polish your teeth.”

Take it easy on the alcohol
Summer seems to bring out an urge to pop open a beer and enjoy the beautiful weather, and when you’re at a festival, it’s hard not to. Unfortunately, drinking alcohol causes halitosis for a number of reasons. Beer and liquor have a strong odor that stays in your mouth while, as well as after, you’re done drinking, especially if you are consuming a lot. Make sure to avoid dark liquors as much as possible as well as strong beers. Secondly, drinking alcohol may cause dry mouth, which in turn causes bad breath. Since it causes you to become dehydrated, your mouth loses moisture. When there isn’t enough saliva to wash down the bacteria that cause bad breath, they just sit in the back of the mouth, on the tongue and along the gums.

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Taking a Hint: Knowing You Have Bad Breath by Others’ Reactions

Monday, June 10th, 2013

ss-tellafriendDo you ever notice people shying away from you while you’re having a conversation? Could it be that you’re suffering from bad breath? You might hope that a close friend or family member will give you a heads up if your mouth is less-than-fresh, but some people have difficulty being the bearer of bad news. Here are a few ways to make sure you’re on top of your smelly breath:

Subtle cues
Do people often offer you a stick of gum or mint? This could be a signal that your bad breath is affecting social situations. It may be hard to come to terms with the situation, but don’t worry, you’re not alone: Many people experience halitosis from time to time. Think of it this way, the sooner you know about your halitosis symptoms, the quicker you’ll be able to find a long-term solution!

If you think you may have bad breath, pay attention to the way people react when you are speaking to them. Do they turn away or refrain from looking you in the eye? If you notice these non-verbal cues regularly, dig up the confidence to ask someone if this is happening for a reason. While some people naturally have more passive body language, others may be reacting to your bad breath. And remember, there is a chance that someone is going to tell you that you do have bad breath, so just prepare for the answer.

Ida Alvarez, a 31-year-old from, from Los Angeles, always had an inkling she was stinking up the room with her bad breath, but never had a friend give her the heads up. Patricia Napier-Fitzpatrick, founder of The Etiquette School of New York told CNN that while the issue is delicate, it’s better to bring it up to someone than talk behind his or her back about the situation.

“My mom was the one who finally told me my breath smelled bad. She couldn’t hold back,” Alvarez told CNN. “It embarrassed me at first, but I’m happy she said something, because now I watch what I eat, drink more water and use products to get rid of it.”

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