Archive for the ‘halitosis’ Category

It’s Time to Save BIG on TheraBreath!!

Monday, April 14th, 2014

bonus pak sale on now april

Hi there -

The TheraBreath Bonus Pak Sale takes place two to three times per year and is by far our most popular promotion. During the Bonus Pak Sale you can get as much as 65% OFF what you usually spend for TheraBreath premium fresh breath, gum health, and dry mouth products.

Our Bonus Paks are designed to stretch your dollar on the TheraBreath items you use the most:

Bonus Pak A features our most popular TheraBreath products that millions of people use to prevent bad breath and relieve unpleasant dry mouth.

Bonus Pak C includes our most powerful TheraBreath PLUS extra strength formula to treat stubborn or persistent halitosis (bad breath).

Bonus Pak E features our PerioTherapy Gum Health formula to heal and prevent painful, irritated, or bleeding gums.

Bonus Pak L includes a selection of our advanced Probiotic products designed to maintain your oral health and strenghten your body’s natural defenses to certain germs.

PLUS:
During the Bonus Pak Sale, shipping is on us — you don’t pay a cent.
We will get it to you at no charge even if you live in Canada or Mexico!

But what really makes this sale so insanely popular is THIS ADDITIONAL BONUS: Every Bonus Pak you buy during the sale comes with up to $177 in additional BONUS ITEMS — It’s an unbelievable offer! But dont wait to take advantage of it today — it is here for an extremely limited time. Make sure you don’t miss this chance to get up to 65% on everything you need for oral health from TheraBreath.

Shop our Bonus Pak Sale now

For personal help, call 1-800-973-7374 TODAY and mention code BPAPR14EM1
(Monday – Friday 8am – 5pm PDT)

* $25 additional surcharge per Bonus Pak on orders shipped to Mexico.
† BONUS PAK items are available while in-stock only. There are no rain checks available. First come, first served.

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CDC: 1 in 25 US Hospital Patients Acquire Infections

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

US Hospital Patients Infections Halitosis

According to new research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in 25 patients in U.S. hospitals came down with an infection while in care units in 2011.

In the last decade, these antibiotic-resistant infections have become increasingly prevalent. Patients acquired around 721,800 infections at hospitals that year. Of those, about 75,000 died, according to the CDC.

The report comes after a swarm of news stories have detailed the rise in what experts have called “superbugs.” This type of bacteria carries genes that enable them to survive against widely used antibiotics. Basically, these superbugs no longer respond to oral antibiotics.

“Even though we’ve had great success nationally, there still are pockets of hospitals that have rates of infection that are several times the national average,” Dr. Peter Pronovost, director of the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine, told CNN.

The recent statistic is particularly scary, as hospitals are generally considered a place where patients go to improve their conditions, not the opposite.

As you know, a healthy body is inextricably linked to a healthy mouth. So, what happens to your immune system - including these infections – can impact the health of your mouth, leading to halitosis, among other things.

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Human Nose can Distinguish 1 Trillion Smells

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

nose distinguishes trillion smells

We’ve long known that a human’s sense of smell triggers the strongest memories. But recently, scientists figured out exactly how impressive our nostrils really are. According to researchers, the human nose can distinguish at least one trillion different odors, which is millions more than previously estimated.

The findings, published in Science Magazine, debunk the widely-accepted figure that humans can only detect 10,000 scents, putting the sense of smell well below the capabilities of hearing and sight. This number dated back to the 1920s and was not supported by data.

Scientists have estimated that the human ear can distinguish between 340,000 sounds, and the eye and its mere three receptors can differentiate between several million colors. The nose’s abilities, meanwhile, are carried out with the help of 400 olfactory receptors – it’s the largest gene family in the human genome. It makes sense that we would be able to discern many more smells – everything from roses to bad breath - than we can colors.

“Our analysis shows that the human capacity for discriminating smells is much larger than anyone anticipated,” study co-author Leslie Vosshall, head of Rockefeller University’s Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, said in the report. “For smell, nobody ever took the time to test.”

In the study, 26 volunteers were instructed to distinguish between odor mixtures made with 128 different odorant molecules that came from common flavor and fragrance ingredients such as vanilla, mint, apple as well as less pleasant aromas. However, these were combined in groups of up to 30, creating a sort of olfactory white noise.

“When we started mixing them together, we mixed them at equal intensity so all the smells were diluted to the same intensity,” lead author Dr. Andreas Keller from Rockefeller University explained to ABC News.

Participants sampled three vials of scents at a time, two of which were identical, the other having different smell. The test was to see if they could discern which was the outlier, completing 264 comparisons.

Results
While volunteers’ abilities varied greatly, they could, on average, tell the difference between vials with up to 51 percent of the same components. Researchers then extrapolated how many odors the average person could smell if all possible combinations of the 128 odors were sampled, coming to their estimate of at least one trillion.

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National Tooth Fairy Day

Friday, February 21st, 2014

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Get out the wands and dollar bills, because Friday, Feb. 28 is National Tooth Fairy Day.

This holiday celebrates one of children’s favorite visitors. Since losing baby teeth is sometimes a traumatic experience for young children, entering the magical world of the smiling, gift-giving Tooth Fairy helps wash fears away. Whether your child is scared about the pain or what his or her mouth will look like afterward, this is the day to help.

National Tooth Fairy Day marks a great opportunity to share with your kids the importance of keeping your teeth bright and healthy from a young age. Say so long to cavities and bad breath. Studies have shown that how well children take care of their baby teeth often translates into how well they will take care of their teeth as adults.

However, there is one simple, yet frequently overlooked fact: Children’s smiles depend on their parents. Encourage your kids to brush, floss and eat smart every day. Don’t forget about visits to the dentist, either! Working on habits surrounding oral health for kids will give them a head start on a lifetime of picture-perfect teeth.

Four magical tips
So, before parents tuck money under their child’s pillow at night, here are three things they should put to use to keep their kids smiling through the gaps in their teeth – these tips could even save you money on dental treatments down the line.

  • Brush      following the “two-and-two” rule: twice a day for two      minutes each. Most people spend only 46 seconds brushing, according to      Delta Dental. It’s time to step up your child’s game! For youngsters, one      good way to do this is to bring your smartphone or mp3 player into the      bathroom and play their favorite song. Have them brush until the two-minute      mark. For pre-teens, you and your spouse could decide to lengthen      TV-watching privileges or cut down one of their chores for good      oral care habits.
  • Floss      once a day. Though often considered the forgotten middle child of hygiene      routines, flossing is extremely important, since it can dislodge food      particles from nooks that a toothbrush cannot reach. Some dentists find      that flossing before brushing proves to be more effective in      developing the practice into a habit, since after we      brush we sometimes get the false notion that our mouths feel clean      enough, and we will forego flossing.
  • Fun      tip: Demonstrate what flossing does. Please note that it’s a bit messy! In      the kitchen, put on a pair of plastic (kitchen) gloves, then smear peanut      butter, preferably chunky, over one side of your fingers and between them      all the way down to your knuckles. Then, squeezing your fingers together,      have your child try to brush your fingers, which are serving as the      substitute for teeth. Does the toothbrush clean the food stuck between the      fingers? Now, instruct your child to floss between your fingers. A lot      better, right? This exercise will help visualize the power of      flossing.
  • Visit      the dentist once every six months. There doesn’t have be an      issue with your child’s teeth for them to go in. In fact, their      dentist – and tooth fairy – will be more than pleased to see them when      they don’t have problems! If you notice long-lasting halitosis, or bad breath, it may be      a sign of an underlying issue for your child, such as a rotting      tooth. If the tooth finally comes loose, yank it and leave it for the      tooth fairy. Otherwise, consult your dental professional.

On National Tooth Fairy Day, oral health for kids is the shining star. However, putting these habits to use after Friday and throughout the year will ensure your kid will wear a bright, healthy smile for years to come.

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Diets, Bad Breath and Jerry Seinfeld

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

1421738_56683347Jerry Seinfeld might’ve been the star of the award-winning sitcom “Seinfeld,” but he may also know a thing or two about bad breath. When asked which character on the show had the worst oral odor, Jerry responded that some of women he had “dated” on the show had breath that could rival the stench of “the beast.” During intimate scenes when he would get up close to them, the comedian claimed he could notice which actresses had not eaten that day. He explained that this is because when someone has bad breath, often he or she has skipped a meal. Of the actresses who played his girlfriends, most were concerned about their weight, and during the day they wouldn’t eat. Come show time, their mouths produced quite the stink.

True, when people miss meals or are hungry, they tend to come down with halitosis, or bad breath. A major reason is that saliva production decreases in the mouth during this time. When we are chewing foods, saliva acts as a cleanser that rinses out stray bits of food and anaerobic bacteria that contain stinky sulfur compounds. However, as the muscles in the mouth relax while we are not eating, bacteria accumulates, triggering foul breath.  (more…)

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