Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

Have plans after dinner?

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

So let’s say you have some hot plans for after dinner, but dinner included a caesar salad and a plate of pasta. Maybe even a little red wine? Face it – your breath is not going to do you any favors in the romance department. It’s not exactly rocket science. Most romantic dinners will give anyone serious halitosis.

The thing is, bad breath is really easy to stop before it takes control of that after-dinner situation. Just use TheraBreath in the morning and again before bedtime for 24 hours of bad breath protection. That way you can enjoy your dinner – not smell like it all night.

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Aphrodisiacs Foods May Lead to Unromantic Breath

Monday, February 14th, 2011

Are you planning a romantic Valentine’s Day with your sweetie? A scrumptious dinner perhaps? There are a few foods that are well known to increase the libido, but may also serve up a side of bad breath. This doesn’t mean that you need to skip the aphrodisiacs for a plainer meal, just be aware of their possible links to unromantic breath and do you best to prevent it.

Oysters – a food at the top of the aphrodisiac list, oysters (and most shellfish) are known to have an unpleasant odor with it. While they taste divine, the smell may take remain in your mouth if you don’t take care to freshen your breath after your meal. The food particles may linger, resulting in halitosis.

Garlic and Figs – these foods that are known to increase sex drive have been linked to bad breath, as we have discussed in previous posts. Although they are very delicious touches to a dish, figs and garlic both have high levels of sulfur compounds, which commonly cause bad smelling breath. Bad breath itself is caused by volatile sulfur-producing compounds that thrive in an anaerobic environment – a dry mouth. Eating figs and garlic are really just adding more fuel to the fire of foul breath. A quick solution would be to chew a piece of TheraBreath Chewing Gum post-meal. It’s amazing how fast the garlicky smell is neutralized, as if you never enjoyed the garlic in the first place!

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Women Go To Extremes to Keep Up with Beauty Standards

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

The desire to be thin and beautiful has been in the media for ages. The pressure for young women to attain a body weight that isn’t always healthy has driven many to eating disorders, unhealthy diets and even surgical procedures.

Recently The Sun has reported, there is a new Dukan Diet in Hollywood.  It is a diet that requires eating a diet of only protein. Famous stars such as Jennifer Lopez, Gisele Bunchen and opera singer Katherina Jenkins are on the bandwagon. (more…)

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Crisp Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Bad Breath

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

Crisp Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Bad Breath

A recent article on abcnew.go.com from September 27, 2010 discussed how you can do simple things to improve your breath.

Did you know that eating crisp fruits and vegetables like apples, celery, cucumbers and carrots are natural cleansers? While chewing them, you increase your mouth’s saliva intake. So make sure to eat plenty of these fruits and vegetables – it’s not only good for your digestive health and diet, but your breath too! For more foods that can fix bad breath, read one of our previous postings “Foods that Will Help Bad Breath”.

On the flip side, there are foods that can make your breath worse.

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Black Garlic = No Bad Breath?

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

black garlic

This product may taste like garlic, but allegedly, the ones consuming this food do not suffer from bad breath.  “Black garlic” is created by fermenting a garlic bulb in high temperature for about a month.  On the outside, it looks like a normal garlic bulb with the same papery skin.  On the inside, it appears to be black with a softer texture.

It is often used in fish dishes, and is popular because it is not as potent as conventional garlic. 

The downfall is that it costs quite a bit more to buy these bulbs than it does to purchase regular bulbs in supermarkets.  However, no one likes halitosis, and this may be an answer for those who like food with garlic but not the smelly consequences!

Source: Telegraph

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