Archive for the ‘flossing’ Category

Bad Breath Remedies

Thursday, July 16th, 2009

No one likes having bad breath (halitosis) or smelling it on someone else.  Halitosis comes from the Latin word “halitus,” meaning breath.  As you probably know by now, if we do not care for our teeth and gums properly, bacteria will grow and cause problems like tooth decay.

Finding the correct bad breath/halitosis cure for you may not be easy, because there are a plethora of causes that need different solutions.   There are a variety of causes…everything from rotten food inside the mouth, lung abscess during bronchitis, poor digestion, and other medical conditions.

Saliva is the body’s natural defense against dry mouth and oral malodor.  Saliva helps balance the good and bad bacterias by getting rid of food debris and other unwanted objects that can create foul-smelling compounds.  Saliva is the easiest cure to bad breath.  Morning breath is usually caused by the low production of saliva, so eating breakfast is important to get the salivary glands working in the morning.

Also, there are many foods (onions, coffee, and garlic) and excessive spices that can cause bad breath.  Some of these edibles can take up to 72 hours after digestion before one can smell them on someone’s breath.

Here are some common pointers to avoid halitosis:

  • Brushing regularly
  • Flossing/using mouthwash
  • Getting a dental checkup at least 2X/year
  • Chewing sugar-free gum to moisten the mouth
  • Eating fresh/fibrous vegetables
  • Drinking lots of water and other fluids (excluding sugar-added drinks)
  • Avoiding alcoholic beverages
  • Trying natural remedies like green cardamom, baking soda, and parsley/mint garnishes.

Good luck!

No Comments Yet »

Hydro Floss for Gingivitis and Gum Disease Treatment

Friday, June 19th, 2009

The Hydro Floss®: “A One-Time Investment for a Lifetime of Health & Confidence” – Reduces Tartar and Bacterial Buildup!

 Now you can get to the real source of gum disease, bleeding gums, and bad breath, by using the HydroFloss with Aktivoxigen Serum!

The HydroFloss combines Magneto- hydrodynamics with oral irrigation. By reversing the polarity of the ions at the molecular level, the HydroFloss inhibits the anerobic bacteria’s ability to attach to the tooth/root surface, before they reach a critical mass (which means the beginning of periodontal disease, gingivitis, and bad breath!).

What’s the difference between the HydroFloss and other water irrigation devices? The HydroFloss uses magnetic technology to “pull” plaque, tartar, and bacterial debris off enamel and out from below the gumline.

Here’s a simple explanation on how the HydroFloss provides the highest level of oral hygiene, particularly when used together with AktivOxigen or PerioTherapy Products. Since most of the bacteria are doing their dirty work below the gumline, the only way to attack the cause of the problem is to get into their environment. These anaerobic bacteria (related to the ones that cause bad breath) can easily get under the gumline and between the teeth which can cause periodontal disease and gingivitis. Once they are there, they start to reproduce rapidly and will immediately create plaque in the presence of sugars and other types of food (usually proteins in dairy foods, meat, chicken, fish, etc.).

The sulfur compounds that they produce have a chemical effect on the gum tissue which allows it to become porous and allows other toxins to get under the gums. Once these toxins get into this area, they start to cause gingivitis, periodontal disease, bone loss, loose teeth, and eventually the loss of teeth. This degrading process can be prevented by using the HydroFloss together with Dr Katz’s AktivOxigen or PerioTherapy products. The water/AktivOxigen solution that shoots through the HydroFloss tip becomes “magnetized.”

Plaque is very sticky, but scientifically it attaches tightly to the enamel and roots of your teeth through positive and negative charges. The magnetized water/PeriO2 solution hits the plaque & literally blasts it off the teeth by reversing the polarity at the enamel surface. Nothing else can do this. Once PerioTherapy is blasted under the gumline it will have an oxygenating effect on the bacteria & prevent them from producing the sulfur compounds which started the whole process in the first place.

As periodontal disease progresses, bleeding and sloughing of oral tissue continues, providing a food source for the anaerobic bacteria to produce more sulfur compounds. It then becomes physically impossible to clean below the gum line. That’s where the HydroFloss comes in. To be used properly, we recommend one capful of TheraBreath Oral Rinse to be added to the water trough of the HydroFloss. The oxidizing effect of the TheraBreath formula destroys the bacteria’s ability to break down the proteins and create the sulfur compounds.

Click here to check out the HydroFloss!

2 Comments »

Oral Care is a Big Part of Overall Health!

Friday, April 24th, 2009

oral care

In the long run, not only will maintaining good oral health save you money and unwanted discomfort, but it will help prevent serious diseases. By using your toothbrush frequently, flossing daily, and using antibacterial mouthwash, you will help prevent oral trouble.

As a rule of thumb, it is much easier to prevent problems before they start than restoring your oral health after you begin having problems. Oral health issues can also cause problems in other parts of your body, since there are links between your oral health and your overall health.

As a matter of fact, diabetes and other diseases can get into the blood stream through the mouth. One major disease is oral cancer, and it kills about one-third of those diagnosed. The annual mortality rate of oral cancer is on the rise, and heavy drinking, smoking, and HPV can be associated with the increasing death rate. There are even more deaths yearly from oral cancer than there are from cervical cancer, which is much more discussed in the media.

The president of New Brunswick Dental Society, Dr. Frederic Duke, stated in a news release that there are warning signs that people should know about and have checked out. He said that if a person has a sore that lasts longer than two weeks; a swelling, lump, or growth in or around the mouth or neck; red or white patches in the mouth or on the lips; oral bleeding; or difficulty swallowing/persistent hoarseness, they should have this looked at by a dentist immediately.

No Comments Yet »

Gum disease a silent epidemic for seniors

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

“Savvy Senior” tells us about gum disease — the current statistics, the causes and effects, and the simple preventive measures we can take. Gum disease is more common — and more dangerous than you think. Periotherapy and good oral hygiene are the best weapons against gum disease.

Gum disease — silent but deadly.

October 16, 2007

Dear Savvy Senior: I recently read that gum disease can cause all different types of deadly health conditions. As a senior who brushes regularly and flosses occasionally, what can you tell me about this? — Hate to Floss

Dear Floss: By taking better care of your mouth (which includes daily flossing), you could actually add years to your life! Here’s what you should know.

Dental Services If you don’t have dental insurance or can’t afford professional dental care, some communities and clinics offer discounted or free services to seniors in need, and most dental schools offer low-cost checkups and cleanings. Contact your state dental association (see www.ada.org/ada/organizations ) or your Area Agency on Aging (call (800) 677-1116 to get your local number) to find out what may be available in your area. Also check out the Bureau of Primary Health Care ( www.ask.hrsa.gov/pc ; (888) 275-4772) and the National Foundation of Dentistry for the Handicapped ( www.nfdh.org — click on “Donated Dental Services” or call (888) 471-6334).

Gum disease

Bleeding GumsAlso known as periodontal disease, gum disease is a silent epidemic in this country. Currently, 80 percent of all adults in the United States have some form of gum disease – which ranges from simple gum inflammation (called gingivitis), to serious a disease (called periodontitis) that can infect the gums, bone and other tissue surrounding the teeth.

Consequences

If you have gum disease, you have greatly increased your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. How? Because the bacteria-rich plaque that builds up on your teeth (that’s what causes gum disease) releases toxins into your bloodstream that can inflame your arteries and cause small blood clots. But that’s not all. There are other health problems linked to gum disease such as pancreatic cancer, respiratory diseases, kidney disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, stomach ulcers and even pregnancy complications.

Are you at risk?

Most people develop gum disease because they simply don’t keep their mouths clean. But there are other factors that can increase your risk, including:
• Smoking: Need another reason to quit? Smoking is the number one risk factor for gum disease.
• Age: Older people have a greater risk of periodontal disease because they have more wear and tear on their gums.
• Genetics: If you have a family history of gum disease your risk goes up.
• Medications: Some medications (antihistamines, antidepressants, high blood pressure medications, some heart medicines and many others) can cause dry mouth, and the lack of saliva contributes to gum disease. If you have dry mouth, talk to your doctor or dentist.
• Deficient diet: A diet lacking proper amounts of calcium and vitamin C can contribute to gum disease too.
• Hormonal changes: Changes that occur during pregnancy, menopause or even menstruation can make gums more susceptible for women.
• Diabetes: People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing gum disease. It also makes blood glucose levels harder to control.

Savvy Tip: Check your risk for gum disease at www.perio.org — click on “Assess Your Gum Disease Risk.”

Simple solutions

It only takes about five minutes a day to keep your gums healthy. Here are some simple and familiar ways you can take the bite out of gum disease:
Floss guy• Brush: At least twice a day brush your teeth using fluoride toothpaste and learn how to brush properly. See www.webmd.com/oral-health for a refresher course on brushing and flossing. Also use a toothbrush that has soft bristles. Hard or stiff bristles are more likely to injure your gums. And be sure to replace your brush every three months or so. (Tip: Power toothbrushes with rotating or vibrating bristles have shown to be more effective at removing plaque than manual brushes. See www.oralb.com for oral care products.)
• Floss: Do it at least once a day either before or after you brush. The sequence doesn’t matter as long as you do a thorough job. Flossing removes plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line and is absolutely necessary.• Get checkups: See your dentist every six months for regular cleanings and oral exams.

Source: (http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com)

2 Comments »

Tooth loss may predict later-life dementia: study

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

Megan Rauscher explains why the loss of your teeth may predict the loss of your sanity later in life. Lack of proper gum care causes or aggravates unhealthy gums, weakening of teeth, and eventual loss of teeth. Dr. Harold Katz, of course, has a solution. Periotherapy keeps gums healthy and teeth intact.

TheraBreath

Don’t lose your teeth, and your mind

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – To keep dementia at bay, take care of your teeth. That seems to be the message of a new study in which researchers found a possible link between tooth loss or having very few teeth — one to nine, to be exact — and the development of dementia later in life.

The research team analyzed dental records and brain function test results accumulated over 12 years for 144 people enrolled in the Nun Study – a long-term study of aging and Alzheimer’s disease among Catholic sisters of the School Sisters of Notre Dame. The participants ranged in age from 75 to 98 years.

Among subjects free of dementia at the first cognitive exam, those with no teeth or fewer than nine teeth had a greater than 2-fold increased risk of becoming demented later in life compared with those who had 10 or more teeth, the researchers found.

Roughly one third of subjects with fewer than nine teeth, or no teeth, had dementia at the first cognitive exam.

Dr. Pamela Sparks Stein of the College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, and associates report their findings in The Journal of the American Dental Association.

A number of prior studies have shown that people who suffer from dementia are more likely than their cognitively intact counterparts to have poor oral health, largely due to neglect of oral hygiene.

The current study is one of only a few that asked: Does poor health contribute to the development of dementia? These results suggest it may, although the Kentucky team cautions that it is not clear from the study whether the association is “causal or casual.”

“Common underlying conditions may simultaneously contribute to both tooth loss and dementia,” Stein noted in comments to Reuters Health. In addition to gum disease, early-life nutritional deficiencies, infections or chronic diseases that may result simultaneously in tooth loss and damage to the brain, she explained.

SOURCE: Journal of the American Dental Association, October 2007.

No Comments Yet »