Archive for the ‘dry mouth’ Category

Definitive Guide: Quick answers to your oral health questions

Friday, June 20th, 2014

Quick answers oral health questions

In the last several years, there has been a heavy push underlining oral health’s role in systemic well-being. Since the mouth is the gateway to your body, it’s crucial to pay attention to the small daily steps we can take to keep those pearly whites clean and problem-free. To answer your burning questions, from getting rid of bad breath to removing tonsil stones, here are the solutions and oral health tips:

Where is my bad breath coming from?
Bad breath, also known as halitosis, can come from a range of different sources. The main culprits are: food, poor oral hygiene habits, cavities, using tobacco or alcohol, tonsil stones and dry mouth. Most often, the mouth odor comes from what you eat and your dental hygiene habits. The anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria that live on the surface of the tongue and throat may derive from foods such as onions, garlic or peppers as well as other pungent foods.

It is likely that bad breath originates from plaque buildup that lingers on the teeth and gums. By failing to remove plaque through brushing, flossing and rinsing, your mouth turns into a habitable environment for the bacteria to grow and produce the foul smell.

Not filling cavities properly and skipping professional dental cleaning contributes to a rotten odor. What’s more, dentures should fit well to prevent bacteria from gathering in pockets.

Smoking or chewing tobacco and drinking alcohol dry out the mouth and cause unpleasant breath, so these habits should be avoided.

A lot of times, not drinking enough water or skipping meals can trigger halitosis. Make sure to gulp down plenty of H2O throughout the day. (more…)

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Study: 1 in 10 Americans have Diabetes

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

diabetes dry mouth gum disease

The percentage of Americans with diabetes has almost doubled since 1988, new research shows. Now a staggering 21 million adults in the U.S. have been diagnosed with the blood glucose disease, which has a potent ability to affect their oral health.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the rate of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes was 5.5 percent. By 2010, that number jumped to 9.3 percent, according to the new report.

For the study, which was published in the April 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. This included more than 43,000 adults followed from the first survey period (1988 to 1994) to the most recent (1999 to 2010). From 1988 to 1994, the rate of diagnosed diabetes was 5.5 percent. By the next survey in 1999 to 2004, that number had leapt to 7.6 percent. In the most recent survey, which looked at data from 2005 to 2010, the prevalence of diabetes rose to 9.3 percent.

“Diabetes has increased dramatically,” Dr. Elizabeth Selvin, associate professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the study’s lead author, told HealthDay. “The rates have almost doubled since the late ’80s and early ’90s.”

Understanding diabetes Diabetes is a disorder that causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to rise higher than average. When you consume food and drinks, the body normally breaks down all of the sugars and starches into glucose, which is an essential fuel source for cells. However, for the 21 million Americans with the disease, the body has trouble regulating insulin, the hormone responsible for transferring the sugar from the blood to the cells as nourishment.

There are two main forms of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and usually develops during adulthood, while Type 1 typically occurs in children and young adults, affecting roughly 5 percent of people who have the disease.

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Keeping Up with Oral Health as You Age

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

oral health as you age

May is National Older Americans Month. Despite the belief that many seniors lose their natural teeth as they age, about 75 percent of people 65 and older have retained all or some of their natural teeth.

With that being said, there’s no doubt that older adults face oral health problems. Sure, one might think that he or she need not be concerned about cavities anymore. But, just like with younger people, tooth decay can cause pain and discomfort as well as wear down the gums. In fact, cavities can occur more frequently in older adults for several reasons. Firstly, seniors may not have been exposed to a fluoridated water system as children or used toothpaste that contains fluoride in the past.

As gum tissue begins to recede in older adults, cavities become more prevalent, since plaque has more space to harbor between the teeth and gums. Also, dry mouth, a result of the natural aging process and certain medications, can lead to more tooth decay. Perhaps most relevantly, older adults are also more likely to have decay around older fillings.

“I wish all fillings and dental work would last forever, but dental work requires maintenance,” Dr. Bruce Terry, a member of the Pennsylvania Dental Association, told the Digital Journal. “Everyone should be seen by their dentist regularly to see if there are any broken teeth or fillings. The health of the gum tissues can also be an early sign of several systemic diseases like diabetes.”

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It’s the last day for the Memorial Day Sale at TheraBreath!

Monday, May 26th, 2014

memorial day sale

Hi there,

Happy Memorial Day! So what are your plans today? The beach? A barbecue? Some time relaxing by the pool? Before the festivities get started, take a few minutes to place an order at TheraBreath.com because this is the last day to get 15% off your order of $49 or more PLUS free shipping! Just be sure to enter coupon code AMEM4 during checkout.* This sale, just like Memorial Day, goes kaput at midnight tonight.

On relaxing days such as this, adult beverages are often enjoyed. Did you know that alcohol dries out your mouth, which leads to dry mouth and bad breath? But it doesn’t have to. As long as you use your TheraBreath products, dry mouth and halitosis won’t be an issue, so why not stock up now so you’re set for the entire summer?

Even if you don’t partake in alcohol, the impending summer heat often leads to dry mouth on its own, so be sure to drink plenty of water and (of course) use your TheraBreath.

Enjoy your Memorial Day and your short work week!

* Offer valid on orders shipped to the US and Canada only. Offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Offer expires at 11:59pm PDT May 26, 2014.

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Dry Mouth During Menopause

Monday, May 12th, 2014

dry mouth during menopause

During menopause, many women suffer from dry mouth, a symptom that’s exactly what it sounds like: having a sticky, dry feeling in the mouth. While everyone has a dry mouth once in a while from being nervous or stressed out, dry mouth in middle-aged or older women is likely brought on by a change in hormone levels. The condition may cause trouble chewing, tasting or speaking, and though these symptoms sound alarming, rest assured that they can often be alleviated.

Explaining dry mouth
As a woman enters menopause, her body’s endocrine system undergoes a dramatic shift that results in a drop in estrogen and progesterone, according to health experts. These fluctuating hormone levels impact the salivary glands, often leaving menopausal and postmenopausal women with a persistent feeling of dryness in the mouth.

In all its forms, dry mouth is triggered by the lack of saliva. Saliva plays a bigger role in oral hygiene than you might think, as it works to moisten our mouths and wash away food debris from meals. Think of it as a natural cleansing agent – controlling bacteria and protecting the teeth against plaque buildup.

Yet without enough saliva, the mouth turns into a breeding ground for bacteria. Not only can dry mouth cause discomfort along with bad breath, it can also increase your risk for gingivitis (gum disease), tooth decay and other mouth infections, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. What’s more, your body might not be getting the nutrients it needs if you cannot chew and swallow certain foods properly.

According to a study from the National Institute of Health, roughly 20 percent of people experience dry mouth, medically known as xerostamia. In menopausal women, estrogen levels fall and, in turn, reduce the moisture in the mucus membranes lining the mouth and nose.

Burning mouth syndrome
Some people complain of burning in the mouth too, since the nerve endings become more sensitive. Menopause may also lead to burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a frustrating condition that results in a burning sensation in the tongue, lips and mouth. While it is a very rare problem, the main demographic who grapples with it is middle-aged to older women.

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