Archive for the ‘Clean Tongue’ Category

Cure Gingivitis Before It Causes Bad Breath and Tooth Loss

Monday, February 1st, 2010

gingivitis

Gingivitis is a general term for different types of infections in the gingiva. Bad breath-causing bacteria cause gingivitis, so it is important to keep the oral cavity clean. By exercising proper oral hygiene, you can clean up any gingivitis that you have and prevent it from occuring.

You should brush at least 2-3 times a day, and it is also important that you use a decent toothpaste. PerioTherapy is excellent for those with periodontal infections. Flossing is very important because it gets rid of the plaque between the teeth. Generally, you should floss twice a day (at least once for sure) before you brush your teeth. Try using oral rinse every day (preferably twice at least), since this can reach areas that your dental floss and toothbrush do not reach. A tongue scraper will eradicate bacteria from the tongue. Also, after you use a tongue scraper and toothbrush, make sure to rinse them with hot water.

If left untreated, gingivitis can be really severe and turn into gum disease. Bleeding, swollen, and painful gums all can occur, as well as tooth loss that could allegedly lead to heart disease. If you are dedicated to curing your gingivitis and doing the right procedure, you can get rid of this oral health problem and potentially the bad breath that goes along with it. It not only depends on your dentist, but it also depends on your habits and the oral care products you use.

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Pregnant Mothers with Bad Breath May Be Fatal for Babies

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

stillbirths bad breath

Unfortunately, pregnant women with bad breath may have a problem that is staggering in its implications.  Previously, we have discussed the relationship between gum disease and reproductive health (pregnancy gingivitis), which can result in a baby being born prematurely.  Research shows that the bad breath-causing bacteria may even be linked to stillbirths.

Allegedly, the oral bacteria can be transferred to the placenta if it enters the blood stream through open sores in the gums.  The unborn child is not equipped to fight the disease with its immune system in the same manner an adult can. 

Since bleeding gums/pregnancy gingivitis is extremely common among pregnant women, it is vital that expecting mothers brush and floss frequently during the day, after snacks and meals.  Surgery may be needed for serious infections. 

Whereas pregnancy gingivitis is common, the possibility of having a stillbirth is not.  Nonetheless, taking healthy steps will make pregnancy easier and reduce anxiety levels.  Here are some tips for practicing good oral hygiene:

– Go to the dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings.
– Brush your teeth at least 2-3 times a day, ideally after every meal and snack.  This prevents plaque/tartar building up.
– Floss after every meal.
– Use an oral rinse (like TheraBreath) at least 2 times a day. 
– Use a tongue scraper to prevent the bad breath-causing bacteria from building up.
– Eat healthier (more vegetables, less sweets).

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Mind Your Own Beeswax, Bees Can Cure Bad Breath?

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

Most of us know now that bad breath (halitosis) can be caused by: cavities; dentures; smoking; alcohol; lung, tonsils, adenoid, sinus or throat infections; certain foods (garlic, onions, high sugar products, spicy foods, dairy products); poor oral hygiene; and so on.  We’ve also discussed many different possible cures.  Here are some natural remedies you may not have suspected:

  • Bee Propolis (a resinous mixture that is collected by bees from tree buds and other sources) helps gum infections, as well as other infections.  Obviously, if one is allergic to bees, he or she should not try this method of diffusing bad breath.  Propolis has been used as an antimicrobial, emollient, immunomodulator, dental anti-plaque agent,anti-tumor growth agent, and even in food and musical instruments.
  • Drink water to moisten the mouth, which increases the strength of saliva in the mouth, that cleanses the bad breath bacteria
  • Use a tongue scraper to help remove bacteria
  • Use an odorless form of garlic, which is a natural antiobiotic
  • Zinc also has an antibacterial effect
  • Add half a lemon to a glass a water, and gargle with it
  • When brushing the gums and tongue, use powdered cloves, an herbal remedy for bad breath.  One can keep cloves under the molars without chewing to help maintain fresh breath.
  • Avoid foods like blue cheese, salami, curry, tuna, garlic, onions, anchovies, red meat, milk, coffee, cola, etc.
  • Parsley is a natural deodorizer
  • Cardamom is a breath sweetener
  • Cranberries help fight off the bad breath-causing bacteria
  • Eating a green/raw Guava will help stop bad breath
  • Fruits that are high in Vitamin C, like citrus and oranges, will help control the bad bacteria
  • Eucalyptus Oil is found in many toothpastes and other oral products because it has an active antiseptic ingredient, Eucalyptol
  • Sometimes chewing on sugarless gum or eating sugarless candies will help keep the mouth moist and not contribute to the growth of bad oral bacteria
  • Edible camphor helps against bad breath caused by tonsilitis, sinusitis, and head colds, since it is a very effective throat stimulant.  It helps get rid of clogged mucus, making it a natural and effective nasal decongestant.
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Do You Have a White Tongue or Geographic Tongue? Discover How To Correctly Clean Your Tongue to Make White Tongue Disappear!

Monday, September 10th, 2007
A White Tongue is something that nobody wants to have – not only does a white tongue look abnormal, but left untreated, it’s a strong indication of a breath problem. People who have a condition known as geographic tongue are definitely more likely to experience a white tongue. Geographic Tongue simply means a tongue that has lots of grooves and fissures in it – these grooves and fissures make an excellent breeding ground for the anaerobic bacteria that cause bad breath and a white tongue. The way around this problem is simply making sure that your tongue is kept as clean as possible. But not all tongue cleaning is created equal….Tongue Cleaning (or Tongue Scraping) is a process that the majority of people in the United States don’t do on a daily basis. Yet it’s one of the most important steps you can take to keep your breath clean and fresh.It’s not difficult to do, and it’s not even that particularly time consuming. Yet that extra minute or two per day can reap huge rewards in preventing bad breath, and helping to prevent white tongue and return it to its normal color.A healthy tongue should be slightly moist, smooth, and slightly pinkish in color (see image below left).Under certain conditions, a geographic tongue can become coated, off-color (white, yellow, even black), and dry and cracked (see images below right).

HEALTHY TONGUE: UNHEALTHY, DRY, COATED TONGUES:
 
  Healthy Tongue   White Tongue   Geographic Tongue   Coated Tongue

Let me clarify a few things about tongue cleaning:

 
  1. It’s not necessary to scrape hard
    I’ve seen patients make their tongues bleed because they were pressing down so hard. In general, pressing harder does not remove more bacteria. You simply need to press hard enough so that the tongue cleaner contacts your tongue, flush across the cleaning surface. Try not to leave any gaps.
  2. Tongue Cleaning Alone Does Not Prevent Bad Breath
    Tongue Cleaning does not kill the bacteria that cause bad breath that are breeding below the surface of a geographic tongue. It simply removes the gunk on the surface of your tongue (mucus and food debris) which are a food source for those anaerobic bacteria. In order to get rid of those anaerobic bacteria (which are responsible for white tongue), you must use an oxygenating toothpaste which can penetrate beneath your tongues surface.
  3. It’s not necessary to use one of those complex, expensive gizmos to successfully clean your tongue
    Really, all your need is a fairly rigid instrument, that you can easily make flush with the largest amount possible of your tongues surface area. The electronic tongue cleaners you see can be helpful if you have arthritis, difficulty with coordination, or in general have a tough time performing the actions listed below.
  Recommended Tongue Cleaners:Triple Headed Plastic Tongue Cleaner

 

Step-By-Step Instructions to Successfully Clean A Geographic Tongue and Prevent White Tongue

 
Here is an average tongue cleaning from start to finish from one of my patients who volunteered to allow me to take his picture.

  1. Starting at the very base of your tongue, place the tongue cleaner flush against your tongues surface and make slow sweeping strokes from back-to-front. Start at either side (left or right) and work your way to the other. Depending on the tongue cleaner you are using, you might need to make 3-4 different ‘swaths’ across your tongue.
  2. Once the surface debris from your tongue has been removed, apply a small bead of TheraBreath Oxygenating Toothpaste to the head of your tongue cleaner
  3. Gently coat the suraface of your tongue (as far back as possible without gagging) with the toothpaste. This allows it to penetrate below the surface of your tongue to neutralize those sulfur-producing anaerobic bacteria! There are more bacteria in the rear of your tongue than in the front.
  4. Once your tongue is coated, allow the toothpaste to stay on the surface of your tongue as long as you can. Up to 90 seconds is ideal. If you begin to cough, or your gag reflex kicks in, that’s ok, just spit whenever you need to.
  5. Ideally, it’s best to leave the toothpaste on the surface of your tongue, while you brush your teeth normally.
  White TongueApply TheraBreath ToothpasteGently Scrape TongueHealthy Tongue
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