Archive for the ‘chewing gum’ Category

A New Probiotic Gum That Fights Bad Breath and Infection!

Thursday, March 11th, 2010

probiotics gum

In Canada, a new probiotics gum has been released that allegedly banishes everything from ear aches, strep throat, to halitosis.  The University of British Columbia’s research contributed to the creation of this gum filled with ‘good’ bacteria.

These friendly bacteria, which includes approximately 500 million active Streptococcus salivarius bacteria, help to fight infection and bad breath.  It can help prevent tooth decay since it stops the ‘bad’ bacteria from sticking to the teeth.  According to sources, the gum seems like an effective way to introduce beneficial organisms to the oral cavity. 

In the near future, we’ll likely see toothpastes and oral rinses that carry probiotics.  Also, be sure to check out Aktiv-K12′s oral probiotics.

Source: Canwest News Service

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Dr. Katz is Now a Columnist for Huffington Post!

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010

Our very own Dr. Katz is now a columnist for the Huffington Post!  He wrote his first article for this newspaper today, called “Does Your Breath Make Cupid Faint? How To Keep Your Bad Breath From Wilting Her Valentine’s Day Flowers.”  He gives some major pointers on how you can avoid bad breath on a day where it definitely is a downfall to have halitosis

In the article, he mentions that some sources of bad breath are milk chocolate, candy hearts, foods with a high concentration of sulfur compounds, including onions and garlic (even cauliflower, cabbage, and Brussels Sprouts!), champagne, wine, beer, and other alcoholic beverages.  Furthermore, most oral hygiene products have not changed in over 100 years!  Most mouthwashes contain alcohol, which causes dehydration (thus causing bad breath), and many toothpastes have the harsh detergent Sodium Lauryl Sulfate as an ingredient.  Sodium Lauryl Sulfate allegedly causes canker sores…and halitosis, of course.  Breath mints and chewing gum contain sugar, which helps the bad breath-causing bacteria proliferate in your mouth.  

Dr. Katz provides some tips on combating bad breath on Valentine’s Day.  Try drinking tea instead of coffee, and avoid sugar if you can.  Eat dark chocolate instead of normal chocolate, since it has less sugar and no dairy.  Eat fruits and veggies that have a lot of water like apples, strawberries, watermelon, and celery. 
 
In order to prevent morning-after breath, you should oxygenate your mouth, so keep hydrated and use oxygenating oral products like gum, toothpaste, or mouthwash before you go to sleep.  

Source:  Huffington Post

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Get Rid of Bad Breath from Onions and/or Garlic

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009

garlic onions

Sometimes brushing your teeth after eating onions or garlic won’t stop you from having bad breath. Garlic can stay in your lungs for 1-2 days after you consume it! Therefore, making your breath fresh after eating onions and garlic is more complex than brushing your teeth and gargling. Here are some pointers:

  1. Try drinking some green or mint tea after consuming garlic/onions.
  2. Eat a lemon/drink lemonade.
  3. Chew on parsley, mint leaves, or other strong-tasting fresh herbs
  4. Try eating mixed veggies crushed into a mashed potato like mushrooms, carrots, and other types.
  5. Chew mint/spearmint flavored gum
  6. Drink a small amount of alcohol because it can kill the bacteria that feeds on leftover food in the oral cavity. 
  7. Eat a hard cheese like cheddar or swiss (not American) to cover up the smell
  8. You can try to use a smaller amount of onion or garlic while cooking
  9. Use a spoon to clean off your tongue if you don’t have access to a tongue scraper
  10. Don’t forget to brush your teeth and rinse out your mouth, of course.
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Mind Your Own Beeswax, Bees Can Cure Bad Breath?

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

Most of us know now that bad breath (halitosis) can be caused by: cavities; dentures; smoking; alcohol; lung, tonsils, adenoid, sinus or throat infections; certain foods (garlic, onions, high sugar products, spicy foods, dairy products); poor oral hygiene; and so on.  We’ve also discussed many different possible cures.  Here are some natural remedies you may not have suspected:

  • Bee Propolis (a resinous mixture that is collected by bees from tree buds and other sources) helps gum infections, as well as other infections.  Obviously, if one is allergic to bees, he or she should not try this method of diffusing bad breath.  Propolis has been used as an antimicrobial, emollient, immunomodulator, dental anti-plaque agent,anti-tumor growth agent, and even in food and musical instruments.
  • Drink water to moisten the mouth, which increases the strength of saliva in the mouth, that cleanses the bad breath bacteria
  • Use a tongue scraper to help remove bacteria
  • Use an odorless form of garlic, which is a natural antiobiotic
  • Zinc also has an antibacterial effect
  • Add half a lemon to a glass a water, and gargle with it
  • When brushing the gums and tongue, use powdered cloves, an herbal remedy for bad breath.  One can keep cloves under the molars without chewing to help maintain fresh breath.
  • Avoid foods like blue cheese, salami, curry, tuna, garlic, onions, anchovies, red meat, milk, coffee, cola, etc.
  • Parsley is a natural deodorizer
  • Cardamom is a breath sweetener
  • Cranberries help fight off the bad breath-causing bacteria
  • Eating a green/raw Guava will help stop bad breath
  • Fruits that are high in Vitamin C, like citrus and oranges, will help control the bad bacteria
  • Eucalyptus Oil is found in many toothpastes and other oral products because it has an active antiseptic ingredient, Eucalyptol
  • Sometimes chewing on sugarless gum or eating sugarless candies will help keep the mouth moist and not contribute to the growth of bad oral bacteria
  • Edible camphor helps against bad breath caused by tonsilitis, sinusitis, and head colds, since it is a very effective throat stimulant.  It helps get rid of clogged mucus, making it a natural and effective nasal decongestant.
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Fight Off Tooth Decay and Bad Breath with Magnolia Bark Extract

Tuesday, June 16th, 2009

The magnolia is one of the oldest flowering tree types in the world.  Magnolia bark contains polyphenols, which have been used for centuries by Chinese and Japanese medicine.  Now, the magnolia bark chemicals have been proven to get rid of bad breath.  Research printed in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry shows that breath mints containing magnolia bark extract kill the majority of bacteria that cause tooth decay and bad breath within a half hour.  Magnolia bark extract significantly improves oral health around the world, and may be beneficial if used in chewing gum.

The mouth is an ideal environment for the bacteria that causes bad breath–especially four species of bacteria: Veilonella alcalescens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides melaninogenicus and Klebsiella pneumoniae.  These bacteria feed on food remains, dead cells, and other chemicals in the mouth, and in the process of their feeding, they release foul-smelling gases.  This putrefaction can lead to gum disease and tooth decay.

Regular chewing gum tends to only guard against these bacteria for a short period of time, and anti-bacterial products tend to have negative effects like tooth staining.  A team conducted a research project where they tested the power of a mint with and without the magnolia bark extract.  Without the extract, the mint destroyed just 3.6%  of the bacteria, and with the extract, 61% of the bacteria was killed. 

Furthermore, the extract has also been found to be useful for guarding against cavity-causing bacteria. 

Source: Softpedia

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