Archive for the ‘Canker Sores’ Category

Canker Sores are more likely to cause Halitosis than Stomach Ulcers

Monday, September 10th, 2012

The science of halitosis is constantly evolving. Things that were once considered the main causes of bad breath have often fallen by the wayside, as research has proven them to have little or no connection to oral odor. Consider this situation: You have two kinds of ulcers – aphthous ulcers (also known as canker sores) and a stomach ulcer. Which one is causing your bad breath?

It’s tempting to immediately choose the stomach ulcer, and for many years, oral health experts did just that. They knew that most halitosis comes from odor-causing bacteria (which is true), so they assumed that bad breath came from the stomach and digestive tract.

Today, though, we know that this simply isn’t true. In fact, a new study published in the Journal of Breath Research confirms as much.

Stomach ulcers hurt (but don’t stink)

Scientists from three different health centers in the Netherlands set out to see whether the bacterium that causes stomach ulcers – a nasty little beast called Heliobacter pylori – can also emit enough volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) to make breath smell bad.

It can’t.

As the Dutch team noted, “the concentrations of the VSCs in stomach air were in nearly all cases below the thresholds of objectionability of the various VSCs, indicating that halitosis does not originate in the stomach.” Hence, stomach ulcers can’t cause oral odor.

“Halitosis,” the authors added, “nearly always originates within the oral cavity and seldom or never within the stomach.”

(more…)

No Comments Yet »

Today’s Canker Sore Treatments Beat the old ones

Thursday, June 28th, 2012

If you get a canker sore, you’ve got a wealth of modern treatment options at your fingertips. You can gargle a specialty alcohol-free mouthwash to neutralize the odor or, for a deeper clean, rinse with a periotherapy product. In a pinch, you can even gargle salt water! But it wasn’t always this easy. In the 1800s, canker sore treatments were a little more, shall we say, unpleasant.

One of the weirder and more instructive reads you’ll find on the matter is Samuel North’s The Family Physician and Guide to Health (Waterloo, NY: 1830).

Pages 109-110 are all about canker sores, and the discomfort and bad breath they cause. If you were to follow Mr. North’s advice on canker sores, these are some of the many odd remedies you might try:

- Wash them with soapsuds.

- Rinse with strong tea.

- Apply a pinch of cayenne pepper (yowch!), followed by a poultice of white bread and ginger soaked with tea.

- Hold on a piece of eggshell until it sticks, then let it naturally fall off after several weeks.

(more…)

No Comments Yet »

A Look at Canker Sores

Friday, March 2nd, 2012

Few things evoke a wincing quite like the mention of a canker sore.  Not to be used confused with cold sores (although those are equally disliked) canker sores are those annoying and painful sores that develop in your mouth, making it hard to eat, drink and even talk when they are at their prime. Canker sores are fairly common and short-lived (although it doesn’t seem like it while you have one). Here are some articles that discuss these pesky sores and how you can avoid them.

Having a canker sore is hard to ignore. A canker sore is an erosion of the inner membranes of the mouth and along with pain; they can also cause bad breath. What causes a canker sore? They occur because of bacterial infections but sometimes a small cut or other vexation is the culprit for inviting this microbial growth. What is the best way to try to avoid canker sores? Stay away from mouthwashes and toothpastes that contain sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or alcohol. These ingredients can irritate and dry out your tongue, checks and gums which can lead to inflammation of the delicate tissue in your mouth where canker sores occur.  These inflammations may attract bacteria, leading to a canker sore. Avoiding products with these ingredients can reduce your risk of getting an aphthous ulcer (which is what a canker sore is). If you do get canker sores frequently, you aren’t alone. An article in the British Medical Journal stated that canker sores are the most common condition of the mouth’s membranes in developed countries. Also, don’t worry about spreading the sores to your friends – they aren’t contagious.

Looking for another way to possible eliminate getting canker sores? David Zabriskie, a 32 year old road bicycle racer that participated in his sixth Tour de France this year told the UK Daily Mail what he plans to do to stop canker sores. He’s gone vegan! Not only has eliminating eggs, dairy products and meat from his diet and replacing them with protein-rich seeds and rice stopped his canker sores and saddle rash, but he also stated that this change in diet has actually boosted his performance. Is this just a rare occurrence that David is lucky enough to reap the benefits of? According to several sources, it has been noted that dietary changes can help stop and treat canker sores. Specifically, a study in the Journal of American Board of Family Medicine found that by increasing one’s vitamin B12 levels can help to heal canker sores more quickly. No doubt a change in Zabriskie’s diet gave him a boost of B12, which is also known for increasing energy. Experts still aren’t fully endorsing becoming vegan to eliminate canker sores, but it could be a healthy side effect of making the switch. Rather, since these aphthous ulcers are caused by irritation, dentists are telling patients to avoid oral care products that contain harsh chemicals like SLS and alcohol which can inflame the tissue of the cheeks and gums where canker sores often appear.

(more…)

No Comments Yet »

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Toothpaste

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Toothpaste Basics and Commonly Available Options

Toothpaste or dentifrice refers to a substance, such as a paste, gel or powder, used for cleaning and polishing teeth. Dentifrice is the most commonly used consumer product for maintaining the aesthetics and health of teeth in children and adults (1, 4). It has multiple functions, including removing plaque, limiting halitosis and  applying fluoride to the tooth structure.

Certain active ingredients in toothpaste also impede tooth disease and gingivitis (1, 4). Used in conjunction with a toothbrush, toothpaste enhances the mechanics of brushing, cleaning and polishing with a toothbrush and enables it to reach accessible teeth surfaces (1, 4).

The History of Toothpaste

Research suggests the ancient Egyptians began using toothpaste for oral hygiene around 5000 BC. At nearly the same time, Roman and Greek residents started using toothpaste. Around 500 BC, the populace occupying the regions of India and China also gravitated to the practice of using dentifrice. Like modern humankind, these people used the earliest forms of toothpastes for cleaning their teeth and gums, and eliminating halitosis.

The ingredients in early toothpastes differ from culture to culture. The Egyptians used a combination of  ingredients, including burnt eggshells, ox hooves’ ashes and water. Various powdered mixtures prevailed up to the early 1800s. The modern era of toothpastes began when soap was added to the product, giving it a paste form.

In the 1850s, consumers could buy toothpaste packaged in jars; Colgate started this method of packaging its product in 1873. In the 1890s, Colgate transitioned to selling toothpaste in tin/lead tubes– similar to the toothpaste dispensers used today.

In 1914, manufacturers started adding fluoride to toothpaste. During World War II, a shortage of lead/tin, and leakage of the metal alloy into toothpaste, caused a switch to plastic tubes. Soap remained an ingredient in toothpaste up to 1945. Subsequently, it was replaced with sodium lauryl sulfate.

(more…)

No Comments Yet »

The Latest TheraBreath Blog Reviews and Giveaways

Friday, August 12th, 2011

Please note: if you have already been lucky enough to win one of these bloggers giveaways, please refrain  from entering in order to allow others to win. Thank you!

Healthy Housewife Files has posted her TheraBreath Review. This busy wife and blogger was ideal for testing our products. In her review, she writes “As many of you know, I work as a special education teacher for preschool children with special needs. Specifically, my job is to work with them one-on-one on skills that they are struggling with. They come to my office and sit with me at my table while we work/play. This calls for very close contact. Those of you who have children or who are around them often know that they say whatever is on their minds. They will not hesitate to tell you, ‘Your breath stinks.’” Were our TheraBreath toothpaste, oral rinse and mouth wetting lozenges her savior or a waste of her time? You’ll have to go here to find out.

Kimberley Moments has posted her TheraBreath review and giveaway. She too tested out our toothpaste, lozenges and oral rinse. She had various opinions on our products, one she didn’t like very much at all and we appreciate her honesty. Luckily, someone else loved it. “My fiance Timothy used it and loved it. So it all is based on preferences. He was like ‘Babe i’m keeping the mouthwash K?’ I was like ‘Go at it!’” It’s great to see someone in her family did like it! She also was very sweet and shared our lozenges with her uncle.  “As soon as I was eating one I was thinking OMG, my uncle Nathan might benefit from these mints. What made me think of that is he is in remit-ion from cancer and having radiation in his mouth killed his saliva glands. His mouth gets super dooper dry. I gave him a handful to try and he was happy about them. They truly did help with his dry mouth while sucking on one.” We’re so glad that we could help Uncle Nathan with his dry mouth! Go here to read the entire review and to enter her TheraBreath giveaway too!

Are you a blogger located in the United States and interested in reviewing TheraBreath products?  Just go to http://www.therabreath.com/blogger and fill out the form to let us know. Please note, we do not pay for reviews but will send the products to try at no cost.

No Comments Yet »