Archive for the ‘Cancer’ Category

Bad Breath Test may Detect Stomach Cancer

Monday, April 1st, 2013

stomach-bad-breathThe British Journal of Cancer published research conducted by Israeli and Chinese students that found a bad breath detector has a 90 percent accuracy rate in distinguishing stomach cancer with other common stomach issues in 130 patients. This new breath test is very promising because stomach cancer is difficult to detect, and oftentimes it is too late to control the cancer when doctors determine that a patient is suffering from it. According to the American Cancer Society, the five-year survival rate of stomach cancer is only about 38 percent because of this.

This detector tests bad breath caused by cancerous growths that release volatile organic compounds. It uses a nanomaterial sensor that analyzes the chemicals that are released through the mouth to determine if the bad breath is a sign of the development of stomach cancer. This new method would be much less invasive and simpler than an endoscopy, which is the current and most common method to detect stomach cancer. An endoscopy requires a long, flexible tube with a small camera to be extended down the throat and into the digestive system. But the new detector could be used during a routine checkup by any general practitioner.

“The promising findings from this early study suggest that using a breath test to diagnose stomach cancers, as well as more benign complaints, could be a future alternative to endoscopies - which can be costly and time-consuming, as well as unpleasant to the patient,” Dr. Hossam Haick of Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, and the leader of the team that developed the bad breath detector said.

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Spring Is Here: New Products, New Stores, New Studies!

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011

First of all, we’re proud to announce the following:

An article in the UK’s Daily Mail last week about bad breath entitled “How Mouthwash Can Give You Bad Breath and Stain Your Teeth” mentioned many of the studies I’ve been telling you about over the years including the study from the Australian Dental Society linking alcohol in mouthwash to oral cancer.

What was surprising in this article is that they finally corroborated what I’ve been saying about the dangers of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (the detergent everyone uses in toothpaste — except TheraBreath). Specifically, it says:

“Alcohol based mouthwash has also been linked to an increase risk in oral cancer. Scientists in a study published in The Dental Journal of Australia in 2009 reported that the alcohol in mouthwash allowed cancer causing substances to permeate the lining of the mouth more easily. Some ingredients in toothpaste such as the foaming agent sodium lauryl sulfate can interact with the fluoride in mouthwash and deactivate it so that it loses its effect.”

So as you can see, it literally washes away tons of good stuff, including the fluoride if you’ve previously rinsed with a fluoride mouthwash!

I knew from day 1, that Sodium Lauryl Sulfate was bad news, but the good news is that TheraBreath Toothpaste is and always has been Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and alcohol free! So make sure to visit one of the NEW stores listed above (or click here to find more stores near you), and if you don’t find TheraBreath products on the shelf at any of the stores above, please do me a favor and go talk to the store manager and ask them why not!

To celebrate the new retailers, new products at our current retailers, and the fact that TheraBreath toothpaste does everything we promise it will do, here are some coupons that you can use at any of these stores.

Yours in good oral health,

Harold Katz, DDS

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Protect Your Smile / Stop Halitosis

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

white smile

As you get older, you’ll realize how important proper oral hygiene is.  There are ways you can keep tabs on your oral health every month or so.  Check your mouth for white and red patches, tongue flakiness, pigmented lesions, and sores with uneven borders.  Oral cancer is rare with non-smokers, but it’s still possible to get it.  In order to check yourself for it, look at your outer and inner lips, and all sides of the tongue.  Look on the outside and inside if you cheers, and if there’s ever abnormalities that last longer than 14 days, ask a dental expert about it. 

Here are some things that you can pay attention to in order to protect your oral health:

Canker sores: these tend to pop up when people are stressed.  You can try a topical pain reliever directly on the spot.  Dentists can also use a soft-tissue laser to get rid of them.

Fix bad breath: If you’re not sure that you have bad breath at any given moment, use a cotton ball or gauze pad on the back of your tongue and smell it.  Whenever you brush your teeth, make sure to also get the back of your tongue, since this is where bacteria really like to proliferate.  Alcohol is found in most mouthwashes, but the problem with that is that alcohol helps dehydrate — thus drying the gums and reducing saliva flow.  After this, the bacteria multiples and causes the halitosis to worsen.  Keep in mind that TheraBreath sells an alcohol-free mouthwash!

Back of the mouth: Make sure to get this area when brushing, especially along the gum lines.  If you have a hard time accessing that area when brushing, slighty open the mouth.

Floss, floss, floss!  This is especially needed to prevent tartar buildup.  Toothbrushes can only get so far between the teeth–only 1 millimeter under the gums.  The problem is that gum pockers are usually 3-4 millimeters, which is deeper.  The bacteria feeds off the particles that get caught in these pockets, and if you don’t take care of the issue, you’ll have tooth decay and in extreme cases, jawbone loss.  Keep in mind that 80% of adults allegedly have a form of gum disease!

By practicing good oral hygiene, you’ll help keep your smile white and clean!

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Cancer Patients Need to Maintain Dental Health Prior to Therapy

Friday, July 3rd, 2009

cancer


After the recent deaths of many celebrities including Farrah Fawcett and Michael Jackson, people are realizing that maintaining their health is more important than ever. People who have just learned that they have cancer may not be thinking about taking care of their oral hygiene, but this can have significant consequences. Cancer patients who do not discuss their sitaution with a dentist before starting chemotherapy or radiation may put the health of their teeth in jeopardy or delay their treatment.

 Dr. Mitchell Josephs, a dentist at Palm Beach Towers, tells people about to start chemotherapy that they should get a dental cleaning and X-ray to make sure that there are no abscesses. If there is an emergency extraction to remove an infected tooth, this could disrupt cancer treatment. Obviously, if you have to have emergency dental work done after you started cancer treatment, your healing ability is going to be reduced.

 Therapies can also weaken teeth and cause tooth decay. Chemotherapy and radiation can reduce the mouth’s ability to produce saliva temporarily. Saliva is what protects and coats the teeth so they are not damaged by acidic foods. If a person uses a custom fluoride tray to coat the teeth in a concentrated fluoride solution daily(ten minutes a day) while going through chemotherapy, their teeth are much less likely to be discolored and weakened.

 Decay is usually caused by a very dry mouth. Inflammation of the gums can also be caused by cancer treatment. Dentures that do not fit correctly can make the situation worse by possibly causing ulcerations. This problem can be fixed by getting new dentures or dental implants for replacing the teeth permanently.

 Mouth rinses can help reduce mucositis, which is the ulceration and inflammation of the mouth’s tissue. According to Dr. Daniel Spitz, when a patient goes through chemotherapy, any underlying dental problems will increase the likelihood of there being cavities, bone loss, and tooth loss. If the blood count gets low, bacterial infections can grow out of control.

Source: Palm Beach Daily News

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