Archive for the ‘bad breath’ Category

Your Oral Health Affects Work Productivity

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

work productivity bad breath

Want to be better at your job? Fixing toothaches, gum inflammation and other problems could be the solution.

That’s because a healthy mouth is an important indicator of personal well-being, self-confidence and reduced distractions that allow employees to shovel out optimal work in the office. 

If you don’t think a mighty mouth matters, consider this: Americans lose more than 164 million work hours due to dental health problems, according to a recent Delta Dental Oral Health and Wellbeing Survey. What’s more, the survey indicated that about one in six people in the U.S. (16 percent) miss work because of oral health issues.

The survey also highlighted more than one-quarter of Americans say they have oral health issues that they’d like to address, but are often prevented by their inability to pay for the treatment.

According to a U.S. Surgeon General report, neglecting oral health can lead to needless pain and complications. The social and financial costs of poor oral health can substantially lower your quality of life. 

Often, rotting teeth bring along bad breath, which may not only affect your focus, but that of nearby co-workers. Tooth decay occurs when damaging bacteria combine with leftover food particles to form plaque, which wears away at the protective layer of teeth.  (more…)

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FIFA World Cup: Luis Suarez Sinks Teeth into Opponent

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

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In the 2014 World Cup, Uruguay’s Luis Suarez was hungry for more than a win.

The star forward bit the left shoulder of Italian opponent, Giorgio Chiellini, late in the team’s final group game on June 24.

Suarez, who earned a 10-match ban in 2013 for biting Chelsea’s Branislav Ivanovic and a seven-match ban in 2010 for biting a player in the Eredivisie, now has been barred from the rest of this year’s World Cup in Brazil and all football activities and stadiums for four months. As a result, he will miss Uruguay’s next nine internationals and be fined.

There’s little doubt that the player faces much controversy about his dental incident. In the picture at the dentist’s office that shows all of the things that ruin teeth – chewing on ice, gnawing on a pencil, biting fingernails – sinking chompers into an opponent during a soccer game could rank up there.

During the Uruguay-Italy game, the referee gave no card to Suarez, and Chiellini was livid. The Italian defenseman pulled down his jersey to show the teeth marks on his shoulder.

However, in the days following Uruguay’s 1-0 win against Italy and the FIFA’s verdict, Chiellini said the punishment was too harsh.

“I have always unequivocally considered the disciplinary interventions by the competent bodies, but at the same time I believe the proposed formula is excessive,” Chiellini wrote on his blog. “I sincerely hope he will be allowed to stay close to his teammates during the games, because such a ban is really alienating for a player.” (more…)

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Red Wine as a Cavity Fighter

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

red wine cavity fighterGreat news for oenophiles: You might have heard that red wine benefits the heart, but a recent study suggests that drinking a glass of red wine a day may also prevent cavities.

For the study, which was published in the ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers grew bacterial cultures related to dental diseases, namely Streptococcus mutans. Then, they dipped them into different liquids including red wine, red wine without alcohol, red wine spiked with grape seed extract and water with 12 percent ethanol.

Red wine with or without alcohol as well as wine with grape seed extract proved the best at getting rid of bacteria. By fighting off odorous anaerobic bacteria with non-alcoholic red wine, you could also help avoid bad breath.

Dental diseases are extremely prevalent not only in the U.S., but throughout the world. An estimated 60 to 90 percent of the global population is affected by cavities, periodontal disease and tooth loss, according to the report. 

The problem originates when harmful bacteria in the mouth gather to form biofilms, which are communities of bacteria that produce acid and plaque that damages the walls of the teeth. Of course, brushing with toothpastes that contain fluoride, flossing and rinsing your mouth out with alcohol-free mouthwash can help kill the bacterial plaque.  (more…)

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Definitive Guide: Quick answers to your oral health questions

Friday, June 20th, 2014

Quick answers oral health questions

In the last several years, there has been a heavy push underlining oral health’s role in systemic well-being. Since the mouth is the gateway to your body, it’s crucial to pay attention to the small daily steps we can take to keep those pearly whites clean and problem-free. To answer your burning questions, from getting rid of bad breath to removing tonsil stones, here are the solutions and oral health tips:

Where is my bad breath coming from?
Bad breath, also known as halitosis, can come from a range of different sources. The main culprits are: food, poor oral hygiene habits, cavities, using tobacco or alcohol, tonsil stones and dry mouth. Most often, the mouth odor comes from what you eat and your dental hygiene habits. The anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria that live on the surface of the tongue and throat may derive from foods such as onions, garlic or peppers as well as other pungent foods.

It is likely that bad breath originates from plaque buildup that lingers on the teeth and gums. By failing to remove plaque through brushing, flossing and rinsing, your mouth turns into a habitable environment for the bacteria to grow and produce the foul smell.

Not filling cavities properly and skipping professional dental cleaning contributes to a rotten odor. What’s more, dentures should fit well to prevent bacteria from gathering in pockets.

Smoking or chewing tobacco and drinking alcohol dry out the mouth and cause unpleasant breath, so these habits should be avoided.

A lot of times, not drinking enough water or skipping meals can trigger halitosis. Make sure to gulp down plenty of H2O throughout the day. (more…)

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Things to Know Before Removing Tonsil Stones

Monday, June 16th, 2014

before removing tonsil stones

Tonsil stones are white or yellowish clumps of bacteria that become lodged in the back of the mouth. Few people – even doctors – realize what they actually are, so if you have them or are not sure what they might be, you’re not alone. Health reports estimate around 6 percent of the U.S. population suffers from these bacteria buildups, a culprit of long-lasting bad breath, throat soreness and daily annoyance.

There are home remedies as well as dentist removal services available, put before you try to dislodge the tonsil stones, it’s helpful to know the following things:

What are the causes? 
Also termed tonsilloliths, 
tonsil stones are typically caused by an accumulation of sulfur-producing bacteria and food debris, which can include mucus from post-nasal drip. The debris putrefies in the back of the throat, getting trapped in the tonsil crypts (small pockets that appear on the surface of the tonsils). 

What are the symptoms?
The most common symptoms of tonsilloliths are 
bad breath and a sore throat. Since the lumps are made up of odor-filled bacteria, they tend to produce incessant halitosis. While smaller tonsil stones may not trigger obvious symptoms, larger ones may provoke tonsil swelling, difficulty swallowing and a “foreign body” sensation in the back of the throat. Be on the lookout for metallic taste, throat closing and coughing fits. They can irritate the throat and prompt pain that accompanies swallowing.  (more…)

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