Archive for the ‘bad breath’ Category

National Tooth Fairy Day

Friday, February 21st, 2014

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Get out the wands and dollar bills, because Friday, Feb. 28 is National Tooth Fairy Day.

This holiday celebrates one of children’s favorite visitors. Since losing baby teeth is sometimes a traumatic experience for young children, entering the magical world of the smiling, gift-giving Tooth Fairy helps wash fears away. Whether your child is scared about the pain or what his or her mouth will look like afterward, this is the day to help.

National Tooth Fairy Day marks a great opportunity to share with your kids the importance of keeping your teeth bright and healthy from a young age. Say so long to cavities and bad breath. Studies have shown that how well children take care of their baby teeth often translates into how well they will take care of their teeth as adults.

However, there is one simple, yet frequently overlooked fact: Children’s smiles depend on their parents. Encourage your kids to brush, floss and eat smart every day. Don’t forget about visits to the dentist, either! Working on habits surrounding oral health for kids will give them a head start on a lifetime of picture-perfect teeth.

Four magical tips
So, before parents tuck money under their child’s pillow at night, here are three things they should put to use to keep their kids smiling through the gaps in their teeth – these tips could even save you money on dental treatments down the line.

  • Brush      following the “two-and-two” rule: twice a day for two      minutes each. Most people spend only 46 seconds brushing, according to      Delta Dental. It’s time to step up your child’s game! For youngsters, one      good way to do this is to bring your smartphone or mp3 player into the      bathroom and play their favorite song. Have them brush until the two-minute      mark. For pre-teens, you and your spouse could decide to lengthen      TV-watching privileges or cut down one of their chores for good      oral care habits.
  • Floss      once a day. Though often considered the forgotten middle child of hygiene      routines, flossing is extremely important, since it can dislodge food      particles from nooks that a toothbrush cannot reach. Some dentists find      that flossing before brushing proves to be more effective in      developing the practice into a habit, since after we      brush we sometimes get the false notion that our mouths feel clean      enough, and we will forego flossing.
  • Fun      tip: Demonstrate what flossing does. Please note that it’s a bit messy! In      the kitchen, put on a pair of plastic (kitchen) gloves, then smear peanut      butter, preferably chunky, over one side of your fingers and between them      all the way down to your knuckles. Then, squeezing your fingers together,      have your child try to brush your fingers, which are serving as the      substitute for teeth. Does the toothbrush clean the food stuck between the      fingers? Now, instruct your child to floss between your fingers. A lot      better, right? This exercise will help visualize the power of      flossing.
  • Visit      the dentist once every six months. There doesn’t have be an      issue with your child’s teeth for them to go in. In fact, their      dentist – and tooth fairy – will be more than pleased to see them when      they don’t have problems! If you notice long-lasting halitosis, or bad breath, it may be      a sign of an underlying issue for your child, such as a rotting      tooth. If the tooth finally comes loose, yank it and leave it for the      tooth fairy. Otherwise, consult your dental professional.

On National Tooth Fairy Day, oral health for kids is the shining star. However, putting these habits to use after Friday and throughout the year will ensure your kid will wear a bright, healthy smile for years to come.

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Brightening Athletes’ Smiles at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

1121970_38284485Competitions in the Olympics have moved into the dental chair. 

Throughout the games, the Procter & Gamble Company has sponsored dentists to help athletes achieve top oral health in the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics. Athletes will receive oral care products and educational materials at the dental clinics situated in each of the Olympic Winter Games facilities, where dentists will also offer routine dental care, dental screenings and emergency services.

No one wants a repeat of the 2012 Olympics, when poor dental health was shown to hinder athletic’ performances.

You might presume that for these world-class athletes to remain in top shape, they must have equally “fit,” or healthy, mouths. Yet, dental reports from the London Games indicated that more than half of athletes had shockingly poor oral health – worse than that of the average person their same age. Nearly 55 percent of athletes had signs of cavities, with most having irreversible decay – talk about flexing your bad breath! Even more troubling, 3 out of 4 athletes suffered from gingivitis, or early stage gum disease. The biggest kicker? Many found it worsened their training and performance, whether on the track, the field or in the gymnasium.

“It happened in the past that a dental emergency or poor oral health has seriously influenced the performance of an athlete at one of their most important events,” Dr. Paul Piccininni, a coordinator of dental services for the International Olympic Committee at both the Summer and Winter Olympic Games, noted in a Procter & Gamble Company press release.

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Save Now or Kiss this Sale Goodbye.

Friday, February 14th, 2014

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Hi there,

Happy Valentine’s Day! We’re definitely feeling the love here at TheraBreath with so many of you taking advantage of our 14% off and order of $25 or more (or as we simply call it: the Valentine’s Day deal).

Haven’t taken us up on our offer yet? Since we’re romantics, and we really like you, we’re willing to give this relationship one more shot by reminding you that you still have all day today (until 11:59 PST) to save – but then it’s over. Make sure to stock up and enter coupon code ALUV4 at checkout.

We’ll even help you out on your hot date tonight. Want some interesting dinner conversation? Be sure to read about the history and science of kissing and bad breath written by Dr. Katz the Bad Breath Guru. You’ll definitely score some knowledge points and since you use TheraBreath, you won’t have to worry about your breath while you’re telling that special someone.

Wishing you fresh breath and love,

TheraBreath

* Order value, not including shipping costs and sales tax (where applicable), must be US$25.00 or more to receive discount. Offer valid on orders shipped to the US and Canada only. Offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Offer valid on orders placed from 12:00am PST February 10, 2014, to 11:59pm PST February 14, 2014.

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Savings So Good You’ll Want to Kiss Everyone.

Monday, February 10th, 2014

valentines day deal

Hi there,

Valentine’s Day is almost here and talk turns to romance, kissing, and the hidden fear of bad breath. Who wants to kiss someone with stinky breath? And have you ever really thought about why? Click here to read about the history and science of kissing and bad breath from the Bad Breath Guru himself, Dr. Katz.

The fact is that whether you have a Valentine or not, no one wants to worry about their breath. For this week only, TheraBreath is sharing the love and having a Valentine’s sale. Save 14% off any order of $25 or more. Just enter coupon code ALUV4 at checkout. Now that’s a deal anyone can fall in love with. But just like a kiss, this offer is fleeting so make sure you stock up before this sale ends on Friday.

Wishing you fresh breath and love,

TheraBreath

* Order value, not including shipping costs and sales tax (where applicable), must be US$25.00 or more to receive discount. Offer valid on orders shipped to the US and Canada only. Offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Offer valid on orders placed from 12:00am PST February 10, 2014, to 11:59pm PST February 14, 2014.

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Educating Parents to Improve Kids’ Oral Health

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

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To improve children’s oral health and keep them active in the classroom, education for parents may be the first step. From the early 1970s to the 1990s, the amount of cavities in the baby teeth of children ages 2 to 11 declined, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. However, in their latest study, that trend flipped. A small yet significant rise in tooth decay showed that 42 percent of kids have some form of cavity or dental caries. That’s about 21 million American children.

Education starts at home, where parents are lifelong teachers. Since day one, we learn from what our parents do, how they treat others and how they take care of themselves. You are your kids’ learning models. The attitudes you maintain about oral health inspire theirs and can steer them to live a healthy and balanced lifestyle. Even if your kid seems to rebel against you sometimes, little Johnny or Sara will take after you more than you realize.

After all, tooth decay in primary teeth has hefty implications on dental health later in life.

“We do know from a number of studies that when children have tooth decay in their baby teeth, they tend to have decay later in their adult teeth,” lead researcher Bruce Dye of the National Center of Health Statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told ABC News.

Encourage your children to eat nutritious meals and avoid frequent snacking. If you pack his or her lunch for school, make sure to throw in an apple, banana or some other fruit. Teach them from a young age to develop good habits for flossing and brushing. Dentists recommend that adults and kids floss once a day. Interestingly enough, it has been shown that flossing before brushing is more likely to develop into a habit. Why? Often after we finish with the toothbrush we feel like our mouths are sufficiently clean, so we postpone using the thread until tomorrow … or sometimes next month. Always floss before brushing!

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