Archive for the ‘bad breath cure’ Category

Holiday Halitosis? Figure Out the Causes and Cures

Monday, December 16th, 2013

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‘Tis the season for Christmas carols, reindeer, in-laws and bad breath. That’s right, with the all of the exciting festivities, many folks get stressed out decorating, finalizing travel plans and setting the table for your spouse’s parents. But while a little anxiousness is normal – and may help you complete your shopping list – too much can be bad for your overall and oral health. Here’s how it works: 

The saliva in your mouth acts as a natural cleansing agent, washing down food particles and bacteria. On average, we produce 1.5 liters of saliva throughout the day. However, when we feel stressed, that amount falls sharply, leaving our mouths as dry as your aunt’s over-roasted turkey. As a result, odor-causing bacteria builds up along gum​ lines and teeth, triggering holiday halitosis.

Top causes for stress and bad breath
• Once you leave the cookies and milk out for Santa Claus, be sure not to dawdle around munching all night long. Excess snacking often takes hold of us during the holiday season, and while some is not going to kill you, it makes you more prone to cavities and dental plaque. Grazing on roasted turkey, candy canes and gingerbread men doesn’t give saliva a chance to wash out harmful bacteria. The longer sugars hang on teeth, the more time they have to wear down enamel. Stay on Santa’s good side, and prevent yourself from leaving behind only cookie crumbs.

• Yes, Black Friday is over, but your shopping list may be far from done. If you want to crush your competition in Secret Santa while picking up all the presents that little Sandy and Johnny dream of under the Christmas tree, be proactive. Get your holiday shopping done sooner rather than later. As you know from years past, waiting until the last minute not only leaves you more stressed, it drops the likelihood that your gifts remain in stock. You don’t want your holiday spirit to fall like a weighed-down red sleigh that can’t fly over roof tops. Avoid stress by beating the crowds and stinky breath. (more…)

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Ironically, Some Halitosis ‘Cures’ Cause Bad Breath

Monday, March 11th, 2013

1106110_60320901Bad breath isn’t an acute health problem – that is, it doesn’t happen suddenly or just once. (Unlike, say, a broken bone or chicken pox.) Instead, halitosis is a chronic condition, one that recurs and, for some people, lasts for years without going away at all. This regularity is what makes specialty breath freshening technology so important. Without alcohol-free mouthwashes, periotherapy rinses or oral care probiotics, it’d be vastly harder to keep oral odor at bay.

While non-specialty products either don’t work or have fleeting effects at best, a few products – many of which are ironically marketed as bad breath “cures” – go so far as to cause bad breath. Here are some of the worst offenders, listed in no particular order.

- Herbs. There’s a lot to be said for herbal remedies. After all, they’re where clinical and specialty treatments came from. Yet, there are two sides to that coin. As Irish stand-up comedian Dara O’Briain puts it, “we tested herbal medicines, and what worked became medicine.” His point, embedded in an extended bit on clinical quackery, is that things that sound too good to be true usually are, particularly if they’re marketed as an alternative treatment with a notably vague mechanism of action. Two good cases in point are cayenne pepper and garlic, both of which routinely get recommended as treatments for canker sores. While both are technically good for you, neither is proven to have any significant effect on oral sores or the odor they cause. And, by the way, cayenne pepper on a canker sore? Not a good idea, unless you want to spend 15 minutes shrieking in pain.

- Licorice root. As with the herbs listed above, licorice is sometimes touted as a treatment for odor-causing canker sores. However, after searching the medical literature on the subject, researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) could only find one very small study demonstrating anything to that effect. Larger investigations of licorice root and canker sores just don’t exist, so stick to your specialty breath fresheners for now. (more…)

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Better your health by combating dry mouth

Friday, January 18th, 2013

dry mouth and stressHaving a good night’s sleep is pertinent for a healthy mind and body, but there are some issues that keep us up at night. Do you ever have to get up in the middle of the night to get some water? Suffering from dry mouth can cause pain and discomfort throughout the night and during the day, and it can also be a sign of other illnesses.

During sleep, the body is able to restore itself, but if you are waking up in the middle of the night to drink water, this restoration is being interrupted and can cause you to be groggy throughout the day. This can hinder work, weight loss, and increase stress and the probability of sickness. All because of your dry mouth symptoms!

What are the symptoms?

Although “dry mouth” is pretty straightforward, there are other symptoms that you may have as well. You may also have trouble swallowing, chewing and speaking without taking a sip of water. Other people may have cracked and sore skin inside the mouth, and you may have a sandpaper-like tongue.

What is causing it?

There are many reasons why you may be having dry mouth, some that are easily preventable and others are a larger issue that should be taken seriously. If you feel like you’re suffering from post nasal drip, this could be directly related to dry mouth. With this illnesses, the mucus becomes thick, which can sometimes make it challenging to breathe through the mouth.

“The sensation of post-nasal drip is not usually caused by an increased amount of mucus coming from your nose or sinuses,” Dr. Robert Dolan told EverydayHealth. “It is more likely to be caused by the mucus becoming too thick or by irritation of your throat. In my experience, the three most common causes are allergy, gastric reflux, and medications that cause dryness.”

Preventing post nasal drip entirely depends on where it is coming from. Oral medications and natural nasal sprays can combat this issue if it doesn’t stem from a larger illness.

What to change?

Are you a smoker? Do you eat unhealthy foods? Do you commonly drink alcohol or caffeinated beverages? These are all causes of dry mouth! Without having to change much of your lifestyle to combat bad breath, you can try to cut back on the amount of unhealthy things you intake. If you’re a smoker or an avid coffee drinker, make sure that you drink a glass of water afterwards to moisturize the mouth. Drinking a substantial amount of water each day will help eliminate dry mouth. Increasing the amount of fruits and vegetables in your diet can help dramatically as well. Because these items have a large amount of water in them, and vitamins and minerals, they keep the mouth healthy.

What does dry mouth lead to?

Dry mouth can lead to various other oral health issues such as tooth decay, bad breath, a lack of taste and mouth sores. Since the bacteria in our mouths have no chance to get flushed down by saliva – which is what normally happens – it just stays in our mouths and causes these issues. Mouth sores are more common because when there is no protective layer of moisture, there is a much higher risk of cuts and infections.

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Know if dry mouth is temporary, or a real issue

Friday, January 4th, 2013

It’s incredibly common for individuals of all ages to suffer from dry mouth, and sometimes it can be a simple fix. However, other times that dried out feeling in the mouth and the back of the throat can be a side effect of a larger issue that should be addressed. From tooth decay to gum disease to diabetes, it’s important to determine the root cause of your oral health issues. As they say – the mouth offers an insight into the rest of the body.

Get hydrated

So you say you’re suffering from dry mouth. Well, the first thing to do is get ultra hydrated throughout the day. Most people don’t drink enough water as they should, and drinking coffee and soda drinks tend to make the body and mouth even more dried out – requiring more water. Start by drinking at least eight to 10 glasses of water each day. It’s much easier to drink a lot of water if you own a reusable water bottle and carry it along with you wherever you go. Need help keeping track? You could consider purchasing a water bottle with a dial on it that allows you count the bottles you drink as you go. Another trick is to wear eight rubber band bracelets and take one off for each serving of water. This can also kick your bad breath!

Go Natural

Did you know that your toothpaste and mouthwash could actually be the reason why your mouth is feeling dried out? Chemicals like sodium lauryl sulfate, which is found in toothpaste, and alcohol, commonly found in mouthwash, actually cause dry mouth. If you swap these two things for natural toothpaste and alcohol free mouthwash, you may notice a dramatic difference! Your mouth will be feeling fresh and clean without the addition of unwanted ingredients that many people are unaware of in the products.

Still feeling dried out? This may mean that your dry mouth comes from some larger issue. You may want to consult a doctor or talk to a professional that can guide you in the right direction. Having dry mouth can also lead to other issues like bad breath, so swapping these habits will help anyone keep a clean and fresh mouth.

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Easy ways to battle halitosis

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

Do you constantly feel like you’re battling issues of bad breath, and nothing seems to work? Many people suffer from halitosis for various reasons, and you may want to determine where your own problems stem from to properly get rid of it. Here are a few suggestions that – even though they seem obvious – some people overlook.

Brush your teeth!

Obvious? Yes – but some people still don’t brush their teeth effectively to get rid of halitosis. When you were a kid, did your dentist ever tell you to use an hourglass to figure out how long you should be brushing your teeth – about three minutes? This rule still applies. If your brushing sessions are much more brief and you forget to floss and scrape your tongue, you’re not getting rid of all the bacteria in your mouth that causes halitosis.

Also, you need to make sure you are brushing your teeth at least two times a day! Throughout the day, you’re eating food, drinking sugary beverages or even smoking, which causes bad breath. If you aren’t cleaning out your mouth well enough, the bacteria in your mouth has a field day with the sugar and other “food” that gets left behind.

Scraping your tongue is just as important as brushing your teeth, because thats where bacteria gets caught in your mouth – gross! Using alcohol free mouthwash will also help eliminate this bacteria.

Avoid Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and alcohol

You may be surprised that the toothpaste or mouthwash that you’re using actually contains these ingredients that make bad breath worse! Even if it has a “minty” taste, these ingredients dry out your mouth, which leads to bad breath. Using a natural toothpaste will help dramatically with bad breath because it works to kill the bacteria that causes this issue without any added substances that are artificial.

Get hydrated

Drinking plenty of water is really important in helping fresh, non-offensive breath! Why? Because water helps wash down food that may be lingering in your mouth, plus it keeps your mouth moist. Saliva is a natural antibacterial that helps get rid of bacteria in the mouth because it flushes down food particles and sugar that is left on your teeth.

Look at labels

Chewing on gum or popping mints can actually be fairly addictive, but if you are prone to this habit, you should make sure there isn’t sugar that is causing bad breath. Even though these products are often labeled as “breath freshening” they are just quick fixes.

“Make sure to check the label and see that your gum is sugarless since bacteria in the mouth are apt to ferment sugar, thereby making your icky breathe even worse,” Dr. Mitchell told She Knows. “While you’re at it you might consider slashing sugar from the rest of your diet as well to freshen your breath.”

Stay healthy

Bad breath is very often a side effect of a larger problem, and common colds or allergies are big culprits. The excessive mucus in your nose and throat contain bacteria that causes bad breath, and if your nose is stuffed up you’ll likely be breathing through your mouth. This is a bad habit to fall into because it dries out the mouth and further creates bad breath. If you feel as though your sinuses are getting clogged, you may want to invest in bacteria-killing sinus drops and stick to a regimen of gargling with salt water. Salt water helps battle bad breath-causing, and will soothe your throat if it is irritating. It will also help break down thick mucus, which will help the breath become fresher and cleaner.

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