Archive for the ‘bad breath cause’ Category

Electronic Noses may Detect Diseases and Illness through Breath

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

electronic noses detect diseases

It’s been long known that bad breath may be a symptom of oral conditions such as gum disease, but it can reveal much more than mouth issues. When infections, harmful bacteria and other toxins exist in the body, they can create a pungent smell in the mouth. For health care professionals, that abnormal scent is a warning sign that you might have a medical condition. In fact, physicians have been smelling patients’ breath (as well as their bodily fluids) throughout history to help diagnose illnesses – yellow fever, for instance, causes the saliva to smell like a butcher’s shop.

These bad breath smells are often too subtle for the human nose to detect; however, new advancements in biomedical technology may provide a solution. According to BBC News, scientists are developing odor-sniffing machines that can catch these very light scents to aid in diagnosis and treatment. In fact, in early March, researchers found an odor-sniffing machine that can detect breast cancer as effectively as mammograms (it smells like rotting or decay), and they’re hopeful that many other similar instruments for various diseases are in the works.

A 2011 article in the journal Sensors looked into these “electronic nose” applications and revealed just what bad breath and other offensive odors reveal when it comes to disease and illness. If one’s breath resembles acetone (or nail polish remover), it could be a sign of diabetes. That’s because when your body is low on glucose, it must begin burning fat for energy. This causes an excess of ketones in the liver and blood, and one of these ketones is acetone. Many refer to it as a “fruity” scent.

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Have plans after dinner?

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

So let’s say you have some hot plans for after dinner, but dinner included a caesar salad and a plate of pasta. Maybe even a little red wine? Face it – your breath is not going to do you any favors in the romance department. It’s not exactly rocket science. Most romantic dinners will give anyone serious halitosis.

The thing is, bad breath is really easy to stop before it takes control of that after-dinner situation. Just use TheraBreath in the morning and again before bedtime for 24 hours of bad breath protection. That way you can enjoy your dinner – not smell like it all night.

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Holiday Halitosis? Figure Out the Causes and Cures

Monday, December 16th, 2013

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‘Tis the season for Christmas carols, reindeer, in-laws and bad breath. That’s right, with the all of the exciting festivities, many folks get stressed out decorating, finalizing travel plans and setting the table for your spouse’s parents. But while a little anxiousness is normal – and may help you complete your shopping list – too much can be bad for your overall and oral health. Here’s how it works: 

The saliva in your mouth acts as a natural cleansing agent, washing down food particles and bacteria. On average, we produce 1.5 liters of saliva throughout the day. However, when we feel stressed, that amount falls sharply, leaving our mouths as dry as your aunt’s over-roasted turkey. As a result, odor-causing bacteria builds up along gum​ lines and teeth, triggering holiday halitosis.

Top causes for stress and bad breath
• Once you leave the cookies and milk out for Santa Claus, be sure not to dawdle around munching all night long. Excess snacking often takes hold of us during the holiday season, and while some is not going to kill you, it makes you more prone to cavities and dental plaque. Grazing on roasted turkey, candy canes and gingerbread men doesn’t give saliva a chance to wash out harmful bacteria. The longer sugars hang on teeth, the more time they have to wear down enamel. Stay on Santa’s good side, and prevent yourself from leaving behind only cookie crumbs.

• Yes, Black Friday is over, but your shopping list may be far from done. If you want to crush your competition in Secret Santa while picking up all the presents that little Sandy and Johnny dream of under the Christmas tree, be proactive. Get your holiday shopping done sooner rather than later. As you know from years past, waiting until the last minute not only leaves you more stressed, it drops the likelihood that your gifts remain in stock. You don’t want your holiday spirit to fall like a weighed-down red sleigh that can’t fly over roof tops. Avoid stress by beating the crowds and stinky breath. (more…)

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Coffee: The Good and the Bad

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

1242486_53460870A recent study published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, found that those who drink an excessive amount of coffee could have an increased mortality rate. While coffee has been hailed for its health benefits, this new study shows that an extreme amount of coffee could have adverse effects. Coffee has been known to cause bad breath, so maybe it’s best that you stick to three cups or less anyway!

Researchers said that while they do not believe that coffee is the direct cause of increased mortality rate, it may have some association with it. Women between the ages of 20 and 54 who drank more than 28 cups of coffee each week, or more than four cups each day, were more likely to die from any cause more than those who drank moderate amounts of coffee. Men had a 1.5 times increased risk of death compared with their moderate coffee drinker counterparts.

“People who drink more coffee may be prone to higher mortality; however, this may not be cause-and-effect, as there may be something else about the person who drinks 10 cups per day such as an addicting personality or is easily stressed out,” co-author of the study Carl J. Lavie, medical director of cardiac rehabilitation and prevention at Ochsner Medical Center, told MedPage Today.

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Ironically, Some Halitosis ‘Cures’ Cause Bad Breath

Monday, March 11th, 2013

1106110_60320901Bad breath isn’t an acute health problem – that is, it doesn’t happen suddenly or just once. (Unlike, say, a broken bone or chicken pox.) Instead, halitosis is a chronic condition, one that recurs and, for some people, lasts for years without going away at all. This regularity is what makes specialty breath freshening technology so important. Without alcohol-free mouthwashes, periotherapy rinses or oral care probiotics, it’d be vastly harder to keep oral odor at bay.

While non-specialty products either don’t work or have fleeting effects at best, a few products – many of which are ironically marketed as bad breath “cures” – go so far as to cause bad breath. Here are some of the worst offenders, listed in no particular order.

- Herbs. There’s a lot to be said for herbal remedies. After all, they’re where clinical and specialty treatments came from. Yet, there are two sides to that coin. As Irish stand-up comedian Dara O’Briain puts it, “we tested herbal medicines, and what worked became medicine.” His point, embedded in an extended bit on clinical quackery, is that things that sound too good to be true usually are, particularly if they’re marketed as an alternative treatment with a notably vague mechanism of action. Two good cases in point are cayenne pepper and garlic, both of which routinely get recommended as treatments for canker sores. While both are technically good for you, neither is proven to have any significant effect on oral sores or the odor they cause. And, by the way, cayenne pepper on a canker sore? Not a good idea, unless you want to spend 15 minutes shrieking in pain.

- Licorice root. As with the herbs listed above, licorice is sometimes touted as a treatment for odor-causing canker sores. However, after searching the medical literature on the subject, researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) could only find one very small study demonstrating anything to that effect. Larger investigations of licorice root and canker sores just don’t exist, so stick to your specialty breath fresheners for now. (more…)

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