Archive for the ‘Alcohol’ Category

Oral Care is a Big Part of Overall Health!

Friday, April 24th, 2009

oral care

In the long run, not only will maintaining good oral health save you money and unwanted discomfort, but it will help prevent serious diseases. By using your toothbrush frequently, flossing daily, and using antibacterial mouthwash, you will help prevent oral trouble.

As a rule of thumb, it is much easier to prevent problems before they start than restoring your oral health after you begin having problems. Oral health issues can also cause problems in other parts of your body, since there are links between your oral health and your overall health.

As a matter of fact, diabetes and other diseases can get into the blood stream through the mouth. One major disease is oral cancer, and it kills about one-third of those diagnosed. The annual mortality rate of oral cancer is on the rise, and heavy drinking, smoking, and HPV can be associated with the increasing death rate. There are even more deaths yearly from oral cancer than there are from cervical cancer, which is much more discussed in the media.

The president of New Brunswick Dental Society, Dr. Frederic Duke, stated in a news release that there are warning signs that people should know about and have checked out. He said that if a person has a sore that lasts longer than two weeks; a swelling, lump, or growth in or around the mouth or neck; red or white patches in the mouth or on the lips; oral bleeding; or difficulty swallowing/persistent hoarseness, they should have this looked at by a dentist immediately.

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Identify and Avoid Chronic Bad Breath

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

Plugging nose because of bad breath

Chronic bad breath can negatively affect you in social and professional situations.  Unfortunately, we do not always know if we even have bad breath.  So, how do we tell?  Here are a few ways:

1.  If you usually have a white or yellow coating on your tongue, especially on the posterior part (back), this can indicate that you may have the bacteria that causes bad breath.  Try scraping that part of your tongue.

Also, you can lick your wrist, and wait five seconds for it to dry.  Smell the odor on your wrist, and that is what your breath smells like to others.

2.  Often if you have bad tastes inside your mouth, your breath is probably just as bad.

3.  Another way to tell is if people back away from you as you talk.

4.  People offer you mints, breath strips or chewing gum.

5.  Your significant other doesn’t want to kiss you.

What are some ways to stop bad breath from happening?

1.  Improve your oral hygiene, and definitely maintain it.  Also, don’t just brush your teeth, but also floss and use oral rinse for the best results.

2.  Drink plenty of fluids (especially water), but do not drink a lot of coffee and alcohol as these can leave residues that may create worse bad breath.

3.  Eat foods high in fiber as they are very good for your oral health and general wellbeing.

4.  Try to brush your teeth, tongue, and gums immediately after eating dairy foods, fish, and meat because these foods are very heavy on smell.

5. When brushing your teeth, make sure to brush your tongue (especially the posterior where the bacteria thrive).

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Start the New Year with a Bang, Not with Bad Breath

Monday, December 31st, 2007


Happy New Year! Most of us will be starting the year with a party, singing Auld Lang Syne whiletoasting and drinking to our heart’s content.New Year’s Eve parties usually mark the end of the year past and the beginning of the coming year, and alcohol is a staple presence in these parties. It is good to keep everything in moderation — you would want to remember that party, and not have the party remember you for the wrong reasons, right?It is still possible to have great fun without losing consciousness and proper judgment. Make sure that you are sober enough to drive when you do go home, or have a sober person drive you home.

One thing that you also have to be aware of is your breath. Alcohol consumption causes bad breath, something that you wouldn’t want to have in any party.

Alcohol is one of the top bad breath instigators — just next to cigarettes. It is a DESSICANT, or drying agent that makes the anaerobic bacteria in your mouth go crazy and party along with those smelly VSC’s or Volatile Sulfur compounds. You are starting the Year of the Rat, not the year of the Dragon Breath! As you know from information in this website and possibly your own personal problem, the dryer your mouth gets – the worse your breath gets.

Here’s how much alcohol (in Percentage and Proof) is contained in the leading products below:

Product

% Alcohol

As Proof

Other “BAD” Ingredients

Jack Daniels Bourbon

43%

86

bad breath and halitosis

Amaretto Liqueur

28%

56

bad breath and halitosis

Wine – Chardonnay

12.5%

25

bad breath and halitosis

Wine – Merlot

11.5%

23

bad breath and halitosis

Beer

3

6

bad breath and halitosis

TheraBreath

0%

0

bad breath and halitosis

The most common drying agent in food is Alcohol. Alcohol of course is the basis of all “adult” beverages such as Beer, Wine, and Hard liquor. It is used quite often in laboratories to “dry out” hard to reach areas in test tubes and beakers. It is also used, unfortunately in mouthwash, where it only makes the problem worse. If you’re planning to gargle with the same old alcohol-based mouthwash just right before going to that party, or after, before you drive, stop right there.

Your current store bought mouthwash contains ALCOHOL that dries your mouth and SWEETENER that actually feeds the smelly bacteria in your mouth.

That burning sensation you get from regular mouthwash doesn’t kill the bacteria, it just irritates your mouth. We’ll show what WILL do the job quickly and effectively without irritation.

Commercial products are based on outdated theories—That alcohol can stop these problems. In fact, alcohol-based mouthwash may create poor oral health, because it dries out the mouth which in turn causes an increase of dangerous Volatile Sulfur Compounds.

Just a tiny amount of alcohol can make your mouth dry instantly. As we already know, a dry mouth mimics an anaerobic (low oxygen) environment. Now, you’ve already learned what happens when the mouth is dry – it’s a perfect environment for the anaerobes to multiply and create more bad breath! Those strong mediciny or minty tastes are actually put into the mouthwash to mask bad breath – not get rid of it! (By the way, the leading mouthwash contains 27% alcohol – that’s more than a six pack of beer, and believe me, the beer tastes better!) And another interesting point – why do they make their mouthwash blue, green, or brown? What does color have to do with getting rid of bad breath?The answer, is, nothing.

Dr. Katz has created the mouthwash that addresses the root of the bad breath problem.Therabreath mouthwash does not contain alcohol and is the best solution to getting rid of bad breath before and after alcohol intake. It contains aloe vera which is good for gum health, does not contain saccharin (a sugar that feeds the bacteria), and does not leave a stinging feeling in the mouth – falsely believed by many as a sign of great breath. Gargling with alcoholic mouthwash after drinking alcohol is like swallowing ice in a snowy, cold day – it doesn’t make sense. You are merely aggravating the drying effects of the alcohol you drank.

One thing you must also avoid aside from alcohol-based mouthwash is breath mints or gum that are sugar-based. A common “solution” to situational bad breath is to pop a sugar-based breath mint or sugar-based gum. Although you may have a cinnamon-like taste in your mouth, what you’ve really just done is made your bad breath problem MUCH worse. Let me explain:

During your party dinner, you introduced two ‘triggers’ to your mouth (protein and alcohol) that weren’t previously there and made your particular oral environment very eager to begin creating those foul-smelling VSC’s.

Then after dinner, by sucking on that mint, you actually gave those bacteria a food source they LOVE (sugar) to help along the VSC production. Yes, it’s true you TASTE cinnamon or mint, but that’s only a temporary cover up and what people actually SMELL is usually a lot worse.

Dr. Katz has invented a breath mint that really does it job. It’s called Zox — The First Breath Mint To Actually NEUTRALIZE Bad Breath Production.

Dr. Katz created ZOX because he wanted to address the fact that almost all the other ‘breath mints’ on the market DO NOT take into account the principles of halitosis prevention that he’s been studying for the last 10 years. Most of them are created to TASTE GOOD and that’s about it. ZOX was created based on the same clinically proven Zinc/Oxygen/Xylitol principles used by the rest of the TheraBreath product line. It is literally bad breath prevention science packed into a roll of breath mints.

ZOX has no sugar – your breath mint should NEVER have sugar in it. ZOX uses xylitol which is a natural sweetener and has also been proven to have tremendous anti-decay properties.

Dr. Katz also has sugar-free gum alteranatives – Therabreath gum, “French Kiss” (a cinammon flavored gum used in Hollywood) and “Guy” a gum created especially for guys.

So eat, drink, and be merry, but don’t forget to be conscious of your breath.Check out the www.therabreath.com to find the best product that will enable you to enjoy the New Year’s eve festivities (and the entire year to come) without bad breath worries. Therabreath is also available in select stores – please check out the store locator for the location nearest you.

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Drunk as a Skunk, But Very Clean-Smelling

Monday, October 8th, 2007

In related news, a woman who drank three glasses of Listerine is arrested for drunken driving. According to this article, Listerine is actually 26.9% alcohol! Moral of the story: Don’t drink and drive. Moral of the story #2: don’t use alcohol-based mouthwash. Alcohol is a harsh substance that can dry your mouth and actually aggravate bad breath. Therabreath is alcohol-free and is a better alternative.

ADRIAN, Mich. (AP) — A woman who admitted drinking three glasses of mouthwash had a blood-alcohol content more than three times the legal limit when she was arrested for drunken driving, police said Friday.

The woman, identified by police Sgt. Mike Shadbolt as 50-year-old Carol A. Ries, was arrested Sunday night and released on personal bond the next day. She was to be arraigned late next week on a misdemeanor charge of operating under the influence of liquor, Shadbolt said.

Police also found an open bottle of Listerine in Ries’ car, and asked Lenawee County prosecutors Friday to authorize a warrant charging her with having an open intoxicant in a motor vehicle, Shadbolt said. Calls to the prosecutor’s office were not answered after business hours.

Ries showed signs of intoxication after her car rear-ended another vehicle Sunday, Shadbolt said. She told police she had not consumed any alcohol and also passed a Breathalyzer test, but “there was something not quite right about her,” Shadbolt said.

She failed a second test using different equipment and, under further questioning, admitted to drinking three glasses of Listerine earlier in the day, Shadbolt said.

According to Listerine manufacturer Pfizer Inc.’s Web site, original formula Listerine contains 26.9 percent alcohol, more than four times that of many malt liquors. Other varieties contain 21.6 percent alcohol.

No telephone listings for a Carol Ries could be found.

Thanks to Out There reader Daniel H.

(http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,144884,00.html)

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Don’t drink or gargle before you drive – Alcohol in some mouthwashes can lead to false positives in breath tests!

Thursday, October 4th, 2007

What is the first thing that you would do if a cop pulls you over and performs a breath test? If you’ve been drinking slightly, the first thought in your head would be to gargle with some mouthwash to mask the alcohol in your breath. Don’t.A common cause of false readings is alcohol-based mouthwash. The Alcohol in mouthwash can actually increase your blood alcohol content (BAC). Listerine mouthwash, for example, is 27% alcohol.

“Incidentally, Listerine mouthwash can cause a false breath-alcohol test result of 0.43% BAC, which is near the level of coma. These effects last as long as 30 minutes to an hour.” (The Prohibition Times, JUNK SCIENCE: GOVERNMENT TESTS FOR DRUNKDRIVING by John Lee)

Research in Wikipedia also confirms this:

“Mouth alcohol can also be created in other ways. Dentures, for example, will trap alcohol. Periodontal disease can also create pockets in the gums which will contain the alcohol for longer periods. And recent use of mouthwash or breath fresheners—possibly to disguise the smell of alcohol when being pulled over by police—contain fairly high levels of alcohol.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breathalyzer)

Of course, the best way to avoid flunking a breath test is to avoid alcohol entirely. But if you decide to drink moderately enough to be able to drive, and anticipate a breath test, it is a good idea to use non-alcoholic mouthwash. So the next time you go out on a date, you’ll be prepared for literally anything – a kiss, a slow dance, or even a breath test.

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