Archive for the ‘Alcohol’ Category

Is Bad Breath a Warning Sign of Major Illnesses?

Monday, February 15th, 2010

bad breath

Bad breath (halitosis), especially if its chronic, can sometimes be a symptom of a much more major dilemma. It is very important that people do not overlook this problem, because it can be a sign of a terminal illness. Dental experts have linked halitosis to everything from pneumonia, bronchitis, chronic sinus infections to liver problems, kidney problems, and diabetes. People who have gastritis can have halitosis because of their stomach’s high acidic levels.

Unfortunately, most people do not regard bad breath as a serious problem, and just try to disguise it with peppermint or mouthwash. Halitosis has also been linked to chronic acid reflux and constipation. If one is practicing good oral hygiene, and avoiding foods that cause strong odors like petai, onions, etc., then it is possible that one has a problem that is more than just bad breath.

Many people will find that chewing gum only hides the bad breath and bad tastes temporarily. According to dental experts, 80% of bad breath sufferers have a mouth-related illness causing the problem; however, few people actually make regular visits to the dentist as needed. Tooth decay, cavities, gingivitis, dry mouth (xerostamia, caused by the lack of saliva), and oral cancer all cause halitosis. If a person has gum disease and does not treat it, it can lead to serious damage to the gums and jawbone. Some sources say that mouthwashes containing alcohol have been linked to oral cancer!  TheraBreath is an example of a mouthwash that does NOT have alcohol as an ingredient.

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Bad Breath Remedies

Thursday, July 16th, 2009

No one likes having bad breath (halitosis) or smelling it on someone else.  Halitosis comes from the Latin word “halitus,” meaning breath.  As you probably know by now, if we do not care for our teeth and gums properly, bacteria will grow and cause problems like tooth decay.

Finding the correct bad breath/halitosis cure for you may not be easy, because there are a plethora of causes that need different solutions.   There are a variety of causes…everything from rotten food inside the mouth, lung abscess during bronchitis, poor digestion, and other medical conditions.

Saliva is the body’s natural defense against dry mouth and oral malodor.  Saliva helps balance the good and bad bacterias by getting rid of food debris and other unwanted objects that can create foul-smelling compounds.  Saliva is the easiest cure to bad breath.  Morning breath is usually caused by the low production of saliva, so eating breakfast is important to get the salivary glands working in the morning.

Also, there are many foods (onions, coffee, and garlic) and excessive spices that can cause bad breath.  Some of these edibles can take up to 72 hours after digestion before one can smell them on someone’s breath.

Here are some common pointers to avoid halitosis:

  • Brushing regularly
  • Flossing/using mouthwash
  • Getting a dental checkup at least 2X/year
  • Chewing sugar-free gum to moisten the mouth
  • Eating fresh/fibrous vegetables
  • Drinking lots of water and other fluids (excluding sugar-added drinks)
  • Avoiding alcoholic beverages
  • Trying natural remedies like green cardamom, baking soda, and parsley/mint garnishes.

Good luck!

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‘Bad Breath and Sinus’ Frequently Asked Questions

Monday, June 8th, 2009

Whenever I have post nasal drip, my breath gets worse. Does this mean bad breath comes from the sinuses?

No. That’s because the anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria that create bad breath live and breed within the back of the tongue and in the throat. They have the ability to digest mucus (because of high protein content) & then break it down into sulfide molecules, which cause the bad breath & bitter, sour taste. The correct way to fight bad breath due to post nasal drip is to use a combination of nasal/sinus drops and oxygenation tablets, creating an oxygenating solution to cleanse the throat and tonsil area.

Can I still use my regular toothpaste and mouthwash if I use TheraBreath? 

No. Almost all commercial toothpaste’s contain sodium lauryl sulfate (SOAP), placed in toothpaste in order to create a foaming action, so that you think that something is actually happening. It has no beneficial effects at all. Unfortunately it will also inhibit the potency of the active ingredients. That is why those who use Oxyfresh toothpaste should read the ingredients in their toothpaste: It contains sodium lauryl sulfate! This will negate the benefits of the oxidation process.

Once in a while I get these small white round dots that appear on my tonsils, and sometimes I even cough them up. They have an extremely strong odor. What are they and is this related to my breath and taste disorder?  

Those little round globules are known as tonsilloliths and they are most definitely related to halitosis and sour taste. They are created by sulfur gases produced by these bacteria (which are located across from the tonsils in the throat area). The sulfur gas mixes with the mucus and thick saliva in the back of your throat and after a period of time, condense into these concentrated, odorous globs. They are only present when one has tonsils, but not in all cases.

I have had many patients who have actually had their tonsils removed due to misinformation from physicians about this problem. Of course, these patients still had bad breath after having the tonsillectomy, because bad breath does not start in the tonsils, only on the back of the tongue! However, it can branch off into the tonsils.

Important: To reduce halitosis (if you have tonsilloliths) here’s what my patients tell me they have done to solve this problem:

Swallow 1-2 capfuls of the solution created with the AktivOxigen tablets, before bedtime.  Generally, you will feel that the odor and lousy taste are neutralized as the rinse solution passes the tonsil area.

I scrape my tongue all day, but yet I still have bad breath. My dentist gave me this huge tongue scraper and told me to use it daily because it might scrape off the bacteria. I gag just by looking at it. Is there any truth to this or is it just one of those fads? 

Now, that’s a good question! In my opinion, and based on helping tens of thousands of people who have suffered with bad breath, tongue scraping by itself is NOT the answer. In fact, I have seen dozens of cases in my clinics where people have just scraped too hard and for too long, resulting in damage..painful tongue, dry tongue, and burning tongue!

We prefer to use the tongue cleaner as an application device with a very gentle cleansing motion on the tongue from the back to the front. This helps to apply the TheraBreath gel below the tongue’s surface to where the bacteria actually live. The bacteria cannot live ON the tongue surface because they are anaerobes, meaning they can’t survive on the surface.

I don’t have bad breath or any taste problems, but I want to use the best toothpaste and mouthwash you have. Which products should I use? 

I would recommend the PerioTherapy of Oral Rinse and Toothpaste. It’s similar to the TheraBreath PLUS line, but focuses more on gum health, which is still the number one oral disease in the world – more of a problem than cavities by far! And because chronic gum disease can lead to other health problems, such as heart attacks, strokes, pneumonia, and birth problems for pregnant women, we highly recommend PerioTherapy products.

My boyfriend sometimes has bad breath. Is it possible for him to give it to me when we French kiss? 

Simply put: you can’t give bad breath to someone else. The bacteria that create this problem are actually good bacteria and are part of the normal oral flora (the mix of bacteria that you need to function properly). It’s possible that the bacteria in your boyfriend’s mouth (tongue, throat, tonsils) are reacting to his dry mouth, which could have been created by smoking, medication, or alcohol.

I can smell the bad breath coming from my nose when I exhale. What can I do about this? Am I imaging things? 

You are not imagining anything. There are odors that can be detected in some cases as they emanate from the nostrils. This type of odor is due to mucus in the nasal passage and its reaction to bacteria in the nostrils (not in the sinus). It may also be a by-product of the reaction between mucous, post nasal drip, or allergies in the area beyond the sinus (in the naso-pharyngeal area and the throat/tonsil area). The solution is quite simple – TheraBreath Nasal Sinus Drops are the only oxygenating/zinc formula to attack this type of problem.

Is there any way I can whiten my teeth and get rid of bad breath at the same time? I don’t have the time to use dozens of different products several times a day. 

Actually, our TheraBrite toothpaste is BOTH a whitening toothpaste AND a breath toothpaste. Just use it in conjunction with any of our oxygenating rinses – TheraBreath, AktivOxigen, TheraBreath PLUS, and PerioTherapy – All of our products are designed to work together.

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Ingredients (i.e. Alcohol) in Mouthwashes That CAUSE Bad Breath!

Thursday, May 28th, 2009
Alcohol in Mouthwashes Can Cause Bad Breath

Alcohol in Mouthwashes Can Cause Bad Breath

In order to stop bad breath, you must stop the production of the volatile sulfur compounds. The only safe and clinically-proven way to do so is to oxidize away the sulfur compounds and the bacteria that create this problem.

For several decades the large pharmaceutical companies have made commercial products that do not oxidize away the odorous and lousy-tasting sulfur compounds created by anaerobic bacteria. After many attempts to “help” the public, the companies only would rely on masking agents which only cover up the malodor and sour, bitter tastes produced by the sulfur compounds with other stronger tastes (i.e. medicinal, minty) and fragrances.

Alcohol:

The end result was a masking chemical and high levels of alcohol. Alcohol makes your breath worse. Alcohol, in chemical terms, is classified as a DESICCANT, or DRYING AGENT. As you know from information in this website and possibly your own personal problems, the dryer your mouth gets, the worse your breath gets.

Here’s how much alcohol (in Percentage and Proof) is contained in the leading products below:

Product

% Alcohol

As Proof

Jack Daniels Bourbon

43%

86

Amaretto Liqueur

28%

56

Wine – Chardonnay

12.5%

25

Wine – Merlot

11.5%

23

Beer

3

6

TheraBreath Mouthwash

0%

0

You may also ask yourself, “If those common products kill the germs that cause bad breath like they say they do, then why do I still have bad breath?”

 Ingredients in Oral Products

Here are some other strange ingredients added to mouthwash and other oral products! 

Sodium Lauryl Sulfate: Stop Your Washing Your Mouth With Soap!

Unfortunately, the public is unaware of the ingredients in products they use on a daily basis. For instance, nearly every toothpaste contains an ingredient that has been proven to dry out your mouth and is now scientifically linked to canker sores. It’s called sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and is placed into toothpaste (and some mouthwashes) in order to create foaming! (SLS is also the main ingredient in your shampoo – go check it out.) The harshness of this chemical has been proven to create microscopic damage to the oral tissue which lines the inside of your mouth, which then leads to canker sore production. The microscopic damage and shedding of vital oral tissues provides a protein food source to the bacteria that create the volatile sulfur compounds of halitosis and taste disorders. That’s why TheraBreath Oral Products have never contained SLS!

SLS acts just like a detergent. It is used in the laboratory as a membrane destabilizer and solubilizer of proteins and lipids. SLS is used in toothpaste to emulsify (mix) oil and water based ingredients together. In your toothpaste it creates the foam you get when brushing. Since it is classified as a soap, you will easily understand why this ingredient can cause drying inside the mouth for many individuals. The dryness is one of several factors that will lead to bad breath.

Saccharin:

Would you give saccharin to your children? Well, you are – when you provide them with children’s toothpaste from some of the major companies, take a look at their ingredients.

The only toothpaste, formulated to fight bad breath by oxidation AND which does not contain SLS & saccharin is TheraBreath!

Sodium Chlorate:

This is a chemical that is not an oxygenating compound. It sounds like a chemical used in oxygenating products, but in order for it to even start to produce oxygenation, the pH of the solution would need to have a pH of -1 (that’s right -1!). Historically, scientific papers refer to many cases of accidental sodium chlorate poisoning. Consequently, oral products containing chlorates were taken off the market in the UK over 60 years ago (Bibliography of scientific papers on sodium chlorate)!

Benzalkonium Chloride:

Benzalkonium chloride had been used for many years as a preservative in eye drops and also in nasal sprays and drops. Recently, researchers in Europe discovered that this preservative was causing a great deal of allergic reaction among users. It is now estimated that fully 10% of the population is allergic to benzalkonium chloride.

Other studies have shown a direct relationship between BKC and contact dermatitis, another allergic reaction.

Based on these facts, pharmaceutical companies have started to produce eye and nasal drops without BKC in order to provide better products to the public.

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A Few Surprising Causes of Bad Breath

Wednesday, April 29th, 2009

Brushing, flossing, and gargling may all be part of your daily oral hygiene routine, but taking these steps may not be enough if you have other issues.

Medications like antidepressants, diuretics, and aspirin can dry the mouth. With dry mouth, there is a lack of saliva, and saliva is what rinses away bacteria that make breath odor foul.

Bacteria – Some people may be prone to bad breath more than others. Bacteria exist on the tongue, and expel gases as they munch on food particles and other substances broken down from saliva. Also, they multiply at night, since the salivary glands slow down when you are sleeping. H. pylori, a type of bacteria that can cause stomach ulcers, can cause bad breath and gum disease if it finds a place to reside in your mouth.

Respiratory tract infections- While gum and tooth infections can cause bad breath, so can bronchitis, sinusitis, and even colds. RTIs break down tissue, which starts a flow of mucus and cells that feed bacteria that can emit foul odors.

Skipping breakfast– Not only does breakfast benefit your body and mind, but it helps to stimulate saliva production and scrub bacteria from the tongue (depending in what you eat, of course).

Diet- Low-carb diets can burn stored fat, thus creating toxic-smelling ketones. Foods that generate large amounts of amino acids, like dairy products and foods high in protein, can fuel the bacteria that produce bad breath. Obesity has also been linked with bad breath.

Breathing out of your mouth- When the tissues in your mouth are dry, saliva is prevented from washing away bacteria; thus, bad breath is encouraged. Major candidates for this are people who suffer from sleep apnea, asthma, and snoring.

Chronic illnesses- Breath that is chronically potent in a certain smell can signify a disease. For example, kidney failure can make your breath smell fishy, and uncontrolled diabetes can make your breath smell fruity.

Alcohol- Plain and simple, alcohol is dehydrating, and having a dry mouth encourages bad breath.

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