Archive for the ‘alcohol-based mouthwash’ Category

October brings dental hygiene awareness

Monday, October 8th, 2012

If you have bad breath, it’s important to remember that the only way to truly get rid of halitosis is to have a proper oral care regimen that you follow every day. While this may sound like common sense, you may be surprised to learn that Americans received an average score of “D” on a national dental health quiz administered by the American Dental Association (ADA). People were unaware of some of the most important ways to keep teeth healthy and avoid bad breath, such as when to replace their toothbrushes and how often to go to the dentist.

“The results of the survey were quite shocking and really show how important it is for people to become more involved in their own oral health,” said William R. Calnon, D.D.S., ADA president and a practicing dentist in Rochester, New York.

October is Dental Hygiene Awareness Month, and in honor of this occasion, now is a good time to go over some dental care basics and learn why practicing proper oral care is crucial if you want to cure bad breath.

Keep that bacteria in check

First, you need to understand what causes oral hygiene problems such as tooth decay, gum disease and halitosis, and that’s bacteria. Your mouth has so much bacteria in it that if you were able to see them all, it could take all week.

According to Dentistry IQ, nobody knows for sure how much bacteria there is in the mouth, but they do know that it multiplies fast. In a perfect environment, such as a Petri dish, some species of oral bacteria can double their numbers every 20 minutes.

Bacteria also eat and produce waste like most other living organisms, wreaking havoc on your gums and dental enamel and causing some nasty bad breath. This is why you need to brush, floss and use alcohol-free mouthwash and oral care probiotics. These products are designed to help keep bacteria in check and introduce healthy bacteria in the mouth to counteract the bad.

Steps to follow

So what should you do to fight bacteria and keep your mouth healthy? Well, the steps are simple but, you have to do them every day. You can’t brush a few days a week and think you’re doing the trick, since bacteria in the mouth are constantly growing. This is why you have to brush twice a day, every day, and floss at least once.

Also, you should be using alcohol-free mouthwash daily, not only to prevent bad breath, but to keep from developing dry mouth. The bacteria in your mouth can thrive when there are insufficient amounts of saliva to wash them away, which is why you should avoid alcohol-based mouthwash.

You should also avoid snacking between meals, since eating throughout the day will keep your teeth coated in sugar and leftover food particles. Many people mistakenly believe that sugar causes cavities, but in reality, it merely acts as a snack for the bacteria in your mouth. So, stick to three meals a day and consider using alcohol-free mouthwash throughout the day to wash away any remnants of these meals. Remember, you shouldn’t brush after every meal, since this may wear away tooth enamel. Twice a day is enough for a healthy mouth.

Keep all of this in mind as you celebrate Dental Hygiene Awareness Month.

No Comments Yet »

How Sure are You that Your Breath Doesn’t Smell?

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Do you smell bad? It’s a rotten question, but it’s something everyone should ask themselves before they discover people have been trying to tell them about their halitosis or body odor for years. By the time you start smelling your own bad breath, chances are other people have been noticing it for a while. This is because it takes longer for you to notice the scents of your own body, since you’re so used to smelling it all the time.

If you do discover that you have halitosis, the next step is to determine what is causing it. While you may think you know everything that leads to bad breath, you’re probably wrong. There are many surprising things that can cause oral odor, and it’s important for you to determine which of them are wreaking havoc on your mouth.

Like it spicy? Use alcohol-free mouthwash

Are you a fan of spicy foods flavored with curry and other hot ingredients?  According to Prevention Magazine, if you are then you may be experiencing halitosis as a result. The worst part is the odor caused by these foods may last a long time.

“When digested, these foods produce several stinky sulfur-containing gases. Most of these byproducts are metabolized in the intestines and liver, but some, such as allyl methyl sulfide, are absorbed into the bloodstream and released through your lungs and pores, an effect that can last for a few hours or more,” said Debra Jaliman, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, quoted by the news source.

(more…)

No Comments Yet »

Your Alcohol-free Mouthwash need not Turn Your Urine Blue

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

Occasionally, the need for an alcohol-free mouthwash may send you searching through popular health blogs in the hopes of finding a product that will clear up your bad breath. Well, search no more, because TheraBreath offers a number of alcohol-free rinses that can neutralize odor and clean the mouth, all without harsh chemicals.

And if you think synthetic chemical are never marketed as halitosis solutions anymore, just look at how often photodynamic therapy for bad breath, or “blue light therapy,” appears in headlines. This treatment, which is totally unnecessary for eliminating oral odor, uses a chemical that can turn your urine and eye whites blue.

What is photodynamic therapy?

Most recently, an article published by the UK’s Daily Mail discussed using such a treatment for halitosis. In a piece that also touched on using “light therapy” for such conditions as epilepsy, cancer, stroke and stomach ulcers, halitosis stands out a bit. And the article uses a photo of a house lamp to illustrate “harnessing the power of light.” Hopefully your skepticism has been aroused.

As it turns out, so-called blue light treatments for halitosis are based on photodynamic therapy (PT), a century-old medical practice that uses photosensitizing chemicals (plus a narrow spectrum of light wavelengths) to kill pathogens or fight disease.

(more…)

No Comments Yet »

Ingredients in Your Oral Care Products May Hurt More than Help

Friday, March 9th, 2012

Day to day oral care really shouldn’t be rocket science: You brush, floss and rinse twice a day. Seems simple, right? It is to a degree, but it’s important to be aware of what ingredients you are putting in your mouth when you brush your pearly whites. Here are some recent articles that discuss which ingredients to avoid in your oral care products and why.

Many oral care products (especially children’s) such as mouthwash, toothpaste and gum often contain dyes to give them an attractive and bright appearance. There’s nothing wrong with a product wanted to be appealing to eye, right? Well, there might be. According to one article the HealthDay News reports the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will gather a panel of healthcare experts to discuss whether to not these dyes are linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Almost 10 percent of US children from age 4 to 17 have been diagnosed with ADHD according to the Centers to Disease Control and Prevention – that’s roughly 5.4 million youngsters in America alone. The link to ADHD and food dyes has yet to be confirmed, but many health experts already suspect a connection. David Schaub, a psychiatric researcher, professor at Columbia University and FDA panel member told HealthDay News that this pending meeting is “a big step forward” in discussing this issue. While the jury is still out, it’s probably best to stay clear of oral care products that contain dyes to avoid the potential risk of excess dye absorption.

Some people may brush, floss and rinse twice a day but shortly after the deed is done, feel that their bad breath comes back. With good intentions, these same people may purchase and use alcohol-based mouthwashes with mint or cinnamon flavors to cure bad breath. As one article states, while these mouthwashes may mute halitosis for a little while, over time they may actually contribute and cause bad breath. Robin Seymour, as restorative dentist told the UK Daily Mail that some mouthwashes may contain as much as 13 percent of alcohol (by volume). The alcohol in mixed with other natural compounds such as menthol to target oral odor and plaque. While this sounds good in theory, Seymour stated that alcohol dries out the palate and tongue, leaving the anaerobic bacteria that cause bad breath to thrive. With time, the cycle of using an alcohol-based mouthwash, drying out the mouth and having the bacteria multiply may actually make the bad breath bacterial strains more resilient and will allow the microorganisms to thrive in the dry mouth environment. Seymour commented that over time, these types of mouthwashes may stain teeth a pale brown.  Seymour also noted a study that was published in the Dental Journal of Australia that links alcohol-rich mouthwashes to an increased risk of oral cancer.

(more…)

No Comments Yet »

To Avoid a Breathalyzer Mix-up, use an Alcohol-free Mouthwash for Your Bad Breath

Monday, February 27th, 2012

So here’s an odd little conundrum: If you’d like to have sweet-smelling breath the next time you’re pulled over, it’s highly advisable that you use mouthwash every day. (After all, you can’t predict when you’ll be stopped by cops, unless you’re planning on speeding.) However, unless you use an alcohol-free mouthwash, there is a chance that your anti-halitosis regimen can land you a DUI charge.

This is true no matter what country you live in, as evidenced by a recent article in the Hong Kong Standard. The piece pointed out that in India, the odds of this happening are especially tilted, since police officers there often use their noses to diagnose drunkenness, rather than utilizing a breathalyzer.

Why would Indian cops use their sniffers instead of a finely calibrated machine?  ”If we start checking each of them with sensors, it will lead to traffic snarls on the road,” one officer explained to the news source.

Still, even in the U.S., where breathalyzers set the standard for DUI evidence collection, any driver who doesn’t use a specialty, alcohol-free mouthwash runs the risk, however slight, of getting hauled in for boozing that they didn’t have the pleasure of actually experiencing.

The ability of alcohol-based mouthwashes to register on a breathalyzer is no myth. Studies in journals like the aptly titled Alcohol and Alcoholism show that recent use of an alcohol-based mouthrinse can easily mimic a blood-alcohol content above 0.08.

(more…)

No Comments Yet »