5 Things to Avoid at the Summer Barbecue to Stay Kissable

Barbecue kissable bad breath

Barbecue season is upon us. Between the balmy temperatures, breezy summer evenings and get-togethers with friends, our backyards turn into grill hot spots. But all of this finger food brings along a new summer foul: bad breath.

You shouldn’t have to sacrifice savory summertime dishes to keep your breath fresh. Wouldn’t you rather make some small adjustments and have a shot at that summer fling?

Barbecue season is upon us. Between the balmy temperatures, breezy summer evenings and get-togethers with friends, our backyards turn into grill hot spots. But all of this finger food brings along a new summer foul: bad breath.

You shouldn’t have to sacrifice savory summertime dishes to keep your breath fresh. Wouldn’t you rather make some small adjustments and have a shot at that summer fling?

Top 5 Barbecue Foods That Cause Bad Breath

Brushing and flossing your teeth on a daily basis is a staple, but it’s not enough to keep your breath fresh all day long. Food is just one of the many variables that can cause bad breath, and watching what you eat is a good place to start. So, here are the things to keep an eye out for during your next summer grill​ out:

1. Onions on your burger Onions contain sulfur compounds that lead to bad breath. When you eat onions, the nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream, but odors are transferred to the lungs, where they are expelled. Since the odor comes from the lungs instead of the mouth, the smell can be tricky to combat.

2. Garlic and sugar in the barbecue sauce Like onions, garlic contains sulfur compounds that enter the lungs to trigger cringe-worthy summer bad breath. Meanwhile, sugar in most barbecue sauces feeds sulfur-producing bacteria toward the back of the tongue, which grow into even stronger sulfur compounds.

3. Not flossing after eating ribs Smiling after eating ribs is like building a white brick wall with black mortar: there’s often junk stuck between teeth. Bacteria can instantly break down proteins in meat wedged between teeth to create nasty odors as well as bleeding gums. To prevent this from happening, make sure you floss after eating a rack of ribs.

4. Ice cream Up to 50 million Americans deal with symptoms of lactose intolerance, a condition when the body cannot digest lactose, a sugar found in dairy products like milk and ice cream. Certain bacteria can convert dairy proteins into foul-smelling chemicals such as cadaverine and putrescine.

5. Beer Alcohol dries out the mouth, which leads to nasty bad breath. Drink water instead to avoid dehydration. When you do grab a beer, it’s not a bad idea to follow it up with a bottle of water.

Tips for Fresh Breath

1. Drink more water Water rinses down lingering food in the mouth, reducing the fodder that bacteria need to produce halitosis.

2. Brush for two minutes and floss Since most people aren’t going to bring their toothbrush to the party, consider throwing a small floss pick into your pocket or purse.

3. Be wary of alcohol Whether in adult beverages or mouthwash, alcohol is a drying agent that results in bad breath.

4. Avoid sugar-filled mints and gum Long gone are the days where you’d have to scour the convenience store shelves for good-tasting, sugarless gum. You have plenty of options now. Your best bet against bad breath is gum that contains xylitol, which the American Dental Association has recognized as helpful in reducing cavities.

5. Use oxygenating mouthwash and lozenges. On-the-go-sized mouthwash, anyone? Mouthwash along with lozenges work to relieve dry mouth and restore fresh breath. Grab a few individually wrapped lozenges to take for the road.

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