Archive for October, 2013

Ad Council Campaign Successful in First Year

Friday, October 11th, 2013

dental hygiene productsOne year ago, the Ad Council and the Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives announced a campaign to encourage parents to promote good oral hygiene habits in their children. The Kids’ Healthy Mouths campaign received more than $33 million in free ad time and space donations from TV, print, outdoor and digital media outlets. The widespread publicity of the campaign urged parents to encourage their children to brush twice a day for two minutes to avoid tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath.

The motto, ”2min2x,” is used to encourage kids to take precautionary efforts to avoid painful procedures in the future. Preventative measures, like brushing every day, using alcohol-free mouthwash and flossing, can even make it easier for kids to go to the dentist, as they won’t have to fear cavity treatments.

According to the Ad Council study conducted one year after the start of the campaign, more than 50 percent of parents said they had heard or seen the PSAs.

The survey noted a significant increase in the number of parents who reported that their child brushes at least twice a day, compared with prior to the start of the campaign. Specifically, the study showed that 55 percent of English speaking parents, up from 48 percent; and 77 percent of Spanish speaking parents, up from 69 percent, reported better routines since 2012.

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Smiling for National Dental Hygiene Month

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

iStock_000014279123XSmallOctober is National Dental Hygiene Month (NDHM). To celebrate, buy yourself a new toothbrush, a pack of floss, some oral rinse and a wad of gum. After all, the cornerstones of a healthy mouth are “brushing, flossing, rinsing and chewing,” which is the motto of the program. 

For NDHM this year, the American Dental Association (ADA) is focusing on prevention. They emphasize the value of increasing public awareness of preventative services that help maintain good oral health.

It is estimated that 75 percent of adults have periodontal problems in some form. Each year, active, employed adults lose more than 164 million hours of work due to oral health issues. It may have been invigorating to skip school as a kid, but missing work as a grown-up can force you to fall behind with clients, colleagues and important projects. Therefore, the more you stay on top of your dental game, the longer you’ll be able to stay off the bench.

“A clean mouth is the first line of defense for a healthy body,” announced ADHA President Denise Bowers, RDH, PhD. “Oral diseases are prevalent but extremely preventable. Wrigley shares this philosophy with us. As we celebrate our partnership, Wrigley and ADHA would like to remind hygienists and patients that chewing sugar-free gum is good you and should be part of your daily oral health regimen.”

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New Study Looks to Brighten Kids’ Smiles

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

1026563_62274978In recent health news, a dental study is examining babies’ teeth to learn how to better prevent tooth decay in young children.

The SMILE study (Study of Mothers’ and Infants’ Life Event affecting oral health), spearheaded by the University of Adelaide, will investigate 1800 kids from birth until two to three years of age.

“We believe that oral health should not be looked at in isolation from other factors in children’s lives, and that a combined preventive approach, targeting both oral health and general health conditions, could yield significantly greater benefits for children,” explains study leader Associate Professor Loc Do, from the Australian research Centre for Population Oral Health at the University of Adelaide’s School of Dentistry.

In the last several years, there has been a push to understand why tooth decay still remains a prevalent issue in the oral health for kids in the U.S. – especially since the trend has worsened in the 2000s. From the early 1970s until the mid-1990s, tooth caries declined in the baby teeth of children ages 2 to 11. However, based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2004, the trend reversed. Children with baby teeth showed a significant rise in decay. In short, cavities are on the up.

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