Archive for February, 2010

Protect Your Smile / Stop Halitosis

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

white smile

As you get older, you’ll realize how important proper oral hygiene is.  There are ways you can keep tabs on your oral health every month or so.  Check your mouth for white and red patches, tongue flakiness, pigmented lesions, and sores with uneven borders.  Oral cancer is rare with non-smokers, but it’s still possible to get it.  In order to check yourself for it, look at your outer and inner lips, and all sides of the tongue.  Look on the outside and inside if you cheers, and if there’s ever abnormalities that last longer than 14 days, ask a dental expert about it. 

Here are some things that you can pay attention to in order to protect your oral health:

Canker sores: these tend to pop up when people are stressed.  You can try a topical pain reliever directly on the spot.  Dentists can also use a soft-tissue laser to get rid of them.

Fix bad breath: If you’re not sure that you have bad breath at any given moment, use a cotton ball or gauze pad on the back of your tongue and smell it.  Whenever you brush your teeth, make sure to also get the back of your tongue, since this is where bacteria really like to proliferate.  Alcohol is found in most mouthwashes, but the problem with that is that alcohol helps dehydrate — thus drying the gums and reducing saliva flow.  After this, the bacteria multiples and causes the halitosis to worsen.  Keep in mind that TheraBreath sells an alcohol-free mouthwash!

Back of the mouth: Make sure to get this area when brushing, especially along the gum lines.  If you have a hard time accessing that area when brushing, slighty open the mouth.

Floss, floss, floss!  This is especially needed to prevent tartar buildup.  Toothbrushes can only get so far between the teeth–only 1 millimeter under the gums.  The problem is that gum pockers are usually 3-4 millimeters, which is deeper.  The bacteria feeds off the particles that get caught in these pockets, and if you don’t take care of the issue, you’ll have tooth decay and in extreme cases, jawbone loss.  Keep in mind that 80% of adults allegedly have a form of gum disease!

By practicing good oral hygiene, you’ll help keep your smile white and clean!

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Grapefruit Seed Extract: Prevent Halitosis, Post Nasal Drip and Tonsil Stones

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

grapefruit seed extract

Bad Breath, post nasal drip, and tonsil stones are all common problems that people have.  What else do they have in common?  Grapefruit seed extract is an extremely versatile compound that can help cure/prevent these issues. 

 Overall, grapefruit seed extract is great for prevention purposes.  It helps prevent caries/tooth decay, gingivitis/gum disorders, plaque, sore throats and flu viruses.  It also helps with allergies, bladder infections, bacterial cystitis, incontinence, chronic urethritis, candida/fungal/yeast infections, chronic fatigue syndrome, hypotension, chronic inflammation, coughs, laryngitis, diarrhea, earaches, flatulence, gastritis, gastric/duodenal ulcers (H. pylori), parasites, phlegm/mucus, the respiratory system, sinusitis/nasal issues, tonsillitis, thrush, toxic shock syndrome, virulent staph infection, and ulcerative stomatitis

Tonsil stones is a condition that many people have– it is not as uncommon as you might think.  For more information on tonsil stones, its causes and cures, click here.  Alcohol and dairy products can also contribute to the formation of tonsil stones.  All of the aforementioned dental health issues can cause bad breath. The reason as to why grapefruit seed extract works to help these issues is because it kills the bacteria causing plaque, bad breath, and so on.  This extract is antifungal, antibacterial, and antiviral.

Grapefruit seed extract is handy because it is a natural cure with a low toxicity, but it is not recommended to take it longer than a short period of time.  Also, this extract may defeat the bacteria/yeast causing a bad breath smell, but the root of the bad breath problem may still exist.  People should also monitor their intake of red meat, processed foods, and other foods that encourage bad breath.  It will also be harder to see improvement if you are eating sugar and carbohydrates, since these can fuel the bad breath-causing bacteria. 

Grapefruit seed extract has been diluted in mouthwash solutions, in order to promote healthy gums and fresh breath. For information on how to use this extract to prevent or cure bad breath, tonsil stones, post nasal drip, etc., consult a professional who works with natural cures to see what best suits you.

What are some other uses that you probably didn’t know?  Grapefruit seed extract can be useful to prevent infection and relieve pain during tooth extraction, and it can be used to help clean your toothbrush.

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Lil Wayne: Bad Breath After 8 Root Canals?

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

TMZ: Those grills come at a price! In an attempt to preserve what is left of his natural teeth, Lil Wayne had to suffer through eight root canals and other major dental measures.  He had multiple tooth implants redone, some new ones added, and a few real teeth repaired.  He also had his platinum and bejeweled grill removed since he has to go to Riker’s Island prison next month.

His mouth, along with many other well-known rappers, is filled with gold and diamonds.  Some people have gold in their dentures or wear a mouth grill.  Allegedly, these grills can have a very negative effect on the teeth of those who have poor oral hygiene.  People can especially have problems if the grills are not put on properly.

#LilWaynesbreath was actually one of the top trending topics on Twitter, and many people were speculating how Lil Wayne must have bad breath.  One of our followers even said that “maybe TheraBreath can help #LilWaynesbreath”!  If that’s the case, too bad we weren’t there to help!

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Yogurt: Tooth Decay, Gum Disease and Bad Breath Cure

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

sugarless yogurt

According to Japanese research, sugarless yogurt can serve as another remedy for bad breath, tooth decay, and gum disease.  Yogurt had allegedly reduced the levels of hydrogen suphide (a primary cause of halitosis) in 80% of participants in the study conducted by the International Association for Dental Research.  The plaque and gum disease levels were also noticeably lower among those who ate the yogurt. The main bacteria that help reduce bad breath are Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

The study group of volunteers ate 90 grams of yogurt every day for six weeks, while maintaining a strict diet, medication intake, and oral hygiene routine. 

People should consider having sugar-free yogurt as a healthy snack, since sugary snacks rank high in causing tooth decay.  According to statistics, 1/4 people have chronic bad breath, and 19/20 have gum disease sometime in their lives!  By cutting down on the consumption of sugary snacks and chocolate and adopting a good oral hygiene routine, one can start adopting better oral health.

Source: BBC News

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Dental Care for Rabbits – Bad Breath Bunnies

Friday, February 19th, 2010

bad breath rabbits

Those of you who own those adorable bunnies may not realize how vital proper oral care is for them.  Most people do not know how many teeth rabbits actually have.  Besides the four large incisors, they have two tiny incisors, and six upper and five lower cheek teeth on each side.  Rabbits have teeth that are very much like horses’ teeth.  Their teeth are designed for constant wear because they are open-rooted, so the teeth grow nonstop their whole lives.  Because of this, rabbits need a certain amount of fiber in their diets.

A rabbit who only eats pellets will not be able to achieve the constant wear on the teeth that nature intended for it to have.  This can cause abnormal wear to the teeth and possibly sharp edges and points in the teeth, which could in turn cause cuts to the tissues in the oral cavity.  It may cause malocclusion, which is what is caused when the teeth do not meet correctly.   Malocclusion can cause problems like roots that become impacted, elongated, and inflamed, as well as possible bone infections or “jaw abscess”.  Once rabbits have malocclusion, it is very unlikely that the teeth will ever return to normal, and it may require trips to the vet, tooth trims, and surgery. 

As with humans, tooth problems in rabbits cannot be ignored.  Rabbits are prey animals, meaning they are not designed to show signs any illnesses or problems, so a pet rabbit needs to be brought to a vet (experienced in rabbits) regularly to check its health.  A complete exam may require the rabbit to be under anesthesia.  Also, dogs, cats, and birds are not the only animals that can have bad breath–rabbits can have halitosis as well!  If you notice that your rabbit has excessive salivation, tooth grinding, or bad breath, you should definitely take it in to the vet as soon as you can. 

Aside from bringing your rabbit to the vet 1-2 times a year, you can also make sure it has an appropriate diet.  Some things that you can offer your rabbit to provide a fibrous diet are hay, tree branches, leaves and twigs.  It is also important that all of these are gathered from vegetation that is not treated with herbicides, pesticides, fertilizer, etc.   Also, try to place the branches in water or put them in the freezer overnight to kill any insects. 

Rabbit-safe vegetation:

  • Orange/lemon trees: rabbits should be fed fresh or dried branches
  • Apple trees: fresh or dried branches
  • Willow: fresh or dried branches
  • Maple/ash/pine trees: dried branches
  • Rose canes: remove thorns first, and feed the branches fresh or dried

What are some tips for monitoring the dental health of my rabbit?

  • Make sure your rabbit has a good appetite, eats its daily diet of pellets and veggies, and chews his hay often
  • Monitor any changes in the rabbit’s eating habits
  • In order to check for any abnormalities, feel the left and right sides of the rabbit’s head (meaning in front of the eyes, on the cheekbone below the eyes, under the lower jaw, etc.).  If you notice any lump on one side that is not on the other side, take the rabbit to the vet ASAP.
  • Lift up the rabbit’s upper lips to see if the incisors meet evenly– if not, go to the vet!
  • Under the chin, look for any excessive salivating/wetness (not including moisture from eating veggies, drinking water, etc.)
  • If you can smell rabbit bad breath, go to the vet!
  • Eye/nasal discharge can signify that there are teeth problems
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