Archive for July, 2009

How to Prevent Bad Breath – Good Morning America

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

Check out Dr. Katz as he makes yet another appearance on Good Morning America (in July 2009).  He discusses the causes, cures, and measurement of bad breath.  Watch who has the stinkiest breath!

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What Makes TheraBreath Different?

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

 TheraBreath is America’s best selling fresh breath mouthwash and toothpaste regimen. Dr Katz, the formula’s inventor and America’s foremost expert on fresh breath, discusses what makes the formula unique.

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Dog Breath Remedy

Monday, July 6th, 2009

Most of us have smelled dog halitosis (bad breath) at one time or another.  It is the result of the foul odor-producing bacteria buildup in a dog’s lungs, gut, or mouth.  Chronic halitosis in a dog can indicate that it needs better dental care or there is a serious issue in its gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, or liver.

Dog Breath Causes

The more common serious issues are gum (periodontal) or dental disease, and generally the smaller a dog is, the more vulnerable it is to tartar and plague.  There are more serious issues that are possible, but less common, which include more extreme medical problems in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, organs, or respiratory system.

Diagnosing Dog Breath

One should normally bring his or her pet to the veterinarian to diagnose the reason behind the chronic bad breath.  A vet can do a physical eam and laboratory work to pinpoint the problem.  Come prepared with information on your dog’s diet, exercise routine, and behavioral habits.

When Should I Take My Dog To The Vet?

As soon as your dog’s breath has an unusual smell, bring it to the vet.  Here are some symptoms:

1.  Unusually fruity/sweet breath can signify diabetes, especially if the dog has been drinking fluids and urinating more than usual.
2.  Dog breath that smells like urine can mean kidney disease.
3.  Bad breath along with vomiting, lack of appetite, and yellow-tinged corneas and/or gums can signify a liver problem.

Dog Breath Cure

Obviously, treatment depends on the cause of dog breath.  If plaque is the cause, the dog may need a professional dental cleaning.  If diet is the cause, then you should change what your dog is eating.  If the cause of bad breath is related to gastrointestinal, liver, kidney, or lung issues, the vet should know the best route to take.

Prevent Dog Breath

Just because a dog is older does not mean that it is normal to have bad breath.  Always take action and provide the best care that you can for your pet, as a method of prevention.  Here are some good things to do:

1.  Bring the dog in for regular checkups at the vet to make sure it has no underlying medical issues.
2.  Have the vet monitor the condition of the dog’s teeth and breath.
3.  Provide the dog with a high-quality and easily digestible diet.
4.  Brush the dog’s teeth everyday if possible–or as frequently as you can if you cannot everyday.  Be sure to brush with a toothpaste made for dog’s, since toothpaste for human’s can cause digestive problems in canines.
5.  Provide safe chew toys that encourage the natural process of chewing and teeth cleaning.
6.  Research dog treats that help with breath odor.
7.  Research dog oral health products to use at home and discuss them with your vet.

Keep in mind that products designed to mask bad breath may not fix the cause of it.  Also, most of these ideas discussed can also be used for cats.

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Cancer Patients Need to Maintain Dental Health Prior to Therapy

Friday, July 3rd, 2009

cancer


After the recent deaths of many celebrities including Farrah Fawcett and Michael Jackson, people are realizing that maintaining their health is more important than ever. People who have just learned that they have cancer may not be thinking about taking care of their oral hygiene, but this can have significant consequences. Cancer patients who do not discuss their sitaution with a dentist before starting chemotherapy or radiation may put the health of their teeth in jeopardy or delay their treatment.

 Dr. Mitchell Josephs, a dentist at Palm Beach Towers, tells people about to start chemotherapy that they should get a dental cleaning and X-ray to make sure that there are no abscesses. If there is an emergency extraction to remove an infected tooth, this could disrupt cancer treatment. Obviously, if you have to have emergency dental work done after you started cancer treatment, your healing ability is going to be reduced.

 Therapies can also weaken teeth and cause tooth decay. Chemotherapy and radiation can reduce the mouth’s ability to produce saliva temporarily. Saliva is what protects and coats the teeth so they are not damaged by acidic foods. If a person uses a custom fluoride tray to coat the teeth in a concentrated fluoride solution daily(ten minutes a day) while going through chemotherapy, their teeth are much less likely to be discolored and weakened.

 Decay is usually caused by a very dry mouth. Inflammation of the gums can also be caused by cancer treatment. Dentures that do not fit correctly can make the situation worse by possibly causing ulcerations. This problem can be fixed by getting new dentures or dental implants for replacing the teeth permanently.

 Mouth rinses can help reduce mucositis, which is the ulceration and inflammation of the mouth’s tissue. According to Dr. Daniel Spitz, when a patient goes through chemotherapy, any underlying dental problems will increase the likelihood of there being cavities, bone loss, and tooth loss. If the blood count gets low, bacterial infections can grow out of control.

Source: Palm Beach Daily News

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Helicobacter Pylori (H. Pylori) and Bad Breath

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

helicobacter pylori

A Japanese study published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology has shown a strong link between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, the bacteria that can cause stomach ulcers and stomach cancer) and gum disease. However, you may see articles on the internet and on the news incorrectly stating that this bacteria causes bad breath. Dr. Nao Suzuki, leader of the study group, specifically stated that H. pylori does not produce volatile sulfur compounds. Therefore, it does NOT directly produce bad breath.

On the other hand, it is closely associated with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria that cause gum disease. Many of you who are familiar with my own research years ago on the link between gum disease and bad breath, already understand that gum disease can create bad breath by providing fuel to the sulfur-producing bacteria already in the mouth, under the gums, and in the throat and tonsils.

These “fuels” include broken down oral tissue (which contain proteins necessary for odor producing bacteria to create odors) and blood (more proteins for the bad breath bugs). As the gum tissue recedes in the disease process or becomes swollen, it creates a home perfectly designed as a breeding ground for more anaerobic bacteria, since oxygen cannot get into deep pockets.

H. pylori thrives in an acidic environment – after all, it’s real home (in the digestive system) is bathed with gastric juices 24/7. We believe that the increasing incidence of H. pylori in the oral cavity may be due to the highly acidic oral products that have hit the market recently. Most mouthwash, for example, have a pH in the 4-5 range (7.0 is neutral and the lower the number the more acidic). The acidic mouthwashes include those that contain alcohol, those that require mixing, and many of the non-alcohol versions that use strong flavors and/or colors as marketing gimmicks.


H. pylori can be detected by a breath test, blood test, and other tests given to you by a specialist. It is best to get checked out by a professional right away if you suspect that you have this bacteria spiraling out of control in your system.

The good news is that all of our formulas (TheraBreath, PerioTherapy, etc) are above 7.0 and therefore work as ANTACIDS in the oral cavity.

Also, some doctors would prescribe various antibiotics for H. pylori. Make sure that if you take these, you are also taking a good probiotic to offset the damage that antibiotics can do to your immune system–meaning that when antibiotics are killing bad bacteria in your system, they are also killing the good bacteria in your system (which is what makes up your immune system).

So now that we know more about the problem – how do we avoid it — or get rid of it, if you already suffer from gum disease or bad breath? Well, prevention and treatment can be provided by the patented PerioTherapy System. PerioTherapy combines oxygenating compounds with natural and proven antimicrobials such as ZincRx, Tea Tree Oil, CoQ10, Aloe Vera, and Xylitol. The System Kit even includes trays so that the PerioTherapy Gel can be applied directly to problem gums. (PerioTherapy Gel does double duty by also working as your daily toothpaste).

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