Archive for January, 2008

Getting Close on Valentine’s Day without embarrassing Bad Breath

Thursday, January 31st, 2008

The Day of Hearts is coming again – a time when we celebrate romantic love, cherish it with our special someone, or celebrate the beginnings of a romantic relationship. It is different things for different people. Some of us will have a valentine, some of us won’t.getting closeChances are though, on Valentines Day, we will get close to someone.We will meet new people. Because of this, having fresh breath at all times is very important, because you never know when it’s time to get close. How can you have on-the-date freshness if you don’t have time to brush?

Be armed and safe with Therabreath Gum and Zox Mints. “French Kiss”, the gum used by Hollywood Celebrities is also available.

Why won’t regular gum do? Why does it have to be Therabreath? Because most gum out there in the market are sugar-based, and sugar actually feeds the anaerobic bacteria already in mouth. The worse thing that you can do is pop an Altoid in your mouth after you eat – unless you’re egalitarian and you feel that the bacteria should eat too.

Now. . . Exactly what do I put in my gum that makes it so great at keeping your breath fresh? Simple. . . zox

First, I’ve included Zinc Gluconate. Zinc is a known inhibitor of acid production by mutans streptococci (the bacteria in your mouth that cause bad breath). These bacteria thrive in an acidic environment, so when you neutralize acids you kill bacteria (and you help prevent that annoying tinny, metallic taste). In addition, a high level of oral acids is bad for your tooth enamel, so you’re helping to keep a brighter, whiter smile as well. Zinc ions also perform an interesting function when they meet anaerobic bacteria – they “clog” up certain receptors on the outer cell wall of anaerobic bacteria, so that that “bugs” cannot create sulfur compounds. (Zinc gluconate is the best tasting of all the zinc compounds which can be used in oral products.) Lastly, Zinc Gluconate (and only Zinc Gluconate) has been proven to restore sour/bitter/metallic tastes. Studies have shown that people with long term taste disorders can experience a rejuvenation of their taste buds after long-term use of Zinc gluconate gum or lozenges. . . (which is what we use in ZOX and all of our chewing gum formulas – as well as ALL Plus formulas.)

Second, I’ve used Xylitol as a sweetener, instead of sugar or Aspartame (Nutrasweet) like so many other chewing gums. Xylitol is an all-natural sweetener made from the bark of hardwood trees. It is also naturally produced in small quantities in our own bodies.

It is a sugar alcohol, with makes it safe for diabetics because the body doesn’t react to sugar alcohols the same way that it does to sucrose or glucose (found in most of the popular kiddy-flavored gums, such as Big Red, Juicy Fruit, etc.)

Most importantly, it has an interesting property in that it has been proven to fight tooth decay and is the only “sweetener” that does so – the complete opposite of sugar – which oral bacteria use to generate acids, which lead to tooth decay.

Simply put, a good amount of xylitol provides a healthy environment for an oral ecosystem.

Finally, I’ve included Oxygenating Compounds, specially designed to work with chewing gum base, to gently bathe your mouth and throat with oxygenating molecules designed to neutralize any and all volatile sulfur compounds, located in your mouth, throat, tonsils, and even in the upper reaches of your esophagus. Every time you swallow, your saliva – now loaded with oxygen and zinc molecules – bathes the back of your tongue, throat, tonsils area, and even the very beginning of your esophagus, a formerly ignored hiding place for anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria.

Don’t go out on Valentines without these essentials. Carry your box of chocolates in one hand, your roses in the other, and Therabreath Gum or Zox mints in your pocket. The sweetness of your breath really does effect how sweet a time you’ll have with your loved one.

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Scientists bringing bad breath out of the closet

Monday, January 14th, 2008

Tom of “Up to your health” writes about the taboo that is bad breath. Scientists are bringing it out into the open and brainstorming to keep it out of existence. The science of bad breath – revealed.

CHICAGO – On the list of social offenses, bad breath ranks right up there with flatulence and body odor.
And while store shelves are well stocked with remedies ranging from chewing gum and mouthwash to breath strips and drops, researchers are just starting to understand the science of bad breath.

“It’s taboo,” said Patricia Lenton, a clinical researcher at the University of Minnesota’s School of Dentistry. “You are typecast as the smelly person.”

Lenton was one of nearly 200 scientists who attended the International Conference on Breath Odor Research this week in Chicago. Attendees ranged from dentists, chemists and microbiologists to psychologists and even flavor researchers.

Their research ran the gamut from studies on the most effective natural flavors for treating bad breath — cinnamon is a good choice — to the development of an artificial nose for sniffing out oral malodor and links between exhaled air and disease.

“We want to advance the science in this field,” said Christine Wu, a researcher at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s College of Dentistry, who helped organize the conference.

“In dental research, bad breath is neglected because it is not a disease that will kill people,” she said in an interview. “But it’s a huge problem. Everybody suffers from bad breath at one point in their lifetime.”

For most, bad breath occurs when bacteria in the mouth breaks down proteins, producing volatile sulfur compounds that make for foul-smelling breath.

Dry mouth, tooth decay, certain prescription drugs, sinus problems, even diseases like diabetes can cause bad breath.

Most bad breath originates in the mouth, and about 90 percent of the smell comes from the tongue, Lenton said.

“It’s warm. It’s moist. It’s like a large incubator of bacteria,” she said.

Lenton said good oral care is the best weapon for routine bad breath. She recommends regular brushing and flossing, a tongue scraper to remove bacteria from the back of the tongue, and a final rinse with antibacterial mouthwash.

For some, however, it is not actual bad breath that’s the problem. Lenton said anywhere from 4 to 17 percent of the people who seek treatment for breath odor are convinced they have bad breath — even though they do not.

It is a condition some refer to as halitophobia, or the fear of bad breath, and it can interfere with daily life.

“It’s an obsessive compulsive disorder,” Lenton said.

Lenton and Wu hope the conference and others like it will raise the profile of breath research.

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