Archive for October, 2007

Blanchett, Dench talk of bad breath during Elizabethan England

Thursday, October 11th, 2007

by David Germain

Cate Blanchett and Judi Dench have a royal conversation about Elizabethan bad breath on the set of “Notes on a Scandal.” In the Elizabethan Era, basic hygiene was practically unknown.
10/10/2007 | 11:18 PM

LOS ANGELES – When Cate Blanchett and Judi Dench co-starred in last year’s drama “Notes on a Scandal,” their off-camera conversations naturally turned to Queen Elizabeth I, a role each has played.

They didn’t chat about the grand legacy of the long-reigning monarch, though. According to Blanchett, they spoke of stench and halitosis.

“I think we talked sort of generally about how smelly Elizabethan England would have been,” Blanchett told The Associated Press in an interview. “We did talk about the smell and how bad everyone’s breath would have been.”

Blanchett, 38, shot to stardom in 1998’s “Elizabeth.” She reprises the role in “Elizabeth: The Golden Age,” which opens Friday and centers on the queen’s dalliance with the dashing Sir Walter Raleigh (Clive Owen) amid a holy war Catholic Spain wages on Protestant England in the late 16th century.

The 1998 film earned a best-actress Academy Award nomination for Blanchett, who later won the supporting-actress prize for “The Aviator.” Dench won the supporting-actress Oscar for playing the queen in “Shakespeare in Love,” released the same year “Elizabeth” came out.

Blanchett recalled that while she initially had been reluctant to revisit the character, “Elizabeth” director Shekhar Kapur always seemed to have a second film in mind.

“He literally started talking about it the minute we wrapped. I honestly thought he was joking,” Blanchett said. “So I didn’t really pay it much mind. Then over the years, he just kept returning to the idea, and I thought, he’s not simply being provocative. He actually believes there’s something more that we could say.”

The story of Elizabeth may not be over for Blanchett and Kapur. At a recent question-and-answer session with an audience after an advance screening of “The Golden Age,” Blanchett again expressed reluctance about a third chapter.

But the crowd clapped heartily when Kapur raised the idea.

“I keep saying that, because the more people applaud, the more she will be persuaded,” Kapur said. – AP

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Shakespeare and his bad-breathed Mistress

Thursday, October 11th, 2007

In related literature, Shakespeare lovingly writes about his bad-breathed lady in Sonnet 130. Bad breath was so common in Elizabethan England, it even turned up in Shakespeare’s writing. I wonder what Shakespeare would have to say about Therabreath….maybe something like, “Oh my mistress, Therabreath thou must seek, it really works, thou breath improvest in a week.” Enjoy. :)

Sonnet 130

My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damask’d, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.

Shakespeare

 


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Am I being rude if choose to brush and floss my teeth in the office bathroom?

Thursday, October 11th, 2007

Peter Post of The Boston Globe addresses a reader question about ethics and oral hygiene in the workplace. Is it offensive to brush and floss in a common office bathroom? Let’s see what he has to say.

Q: I like to brush and floss my teeth after lunch. I do this in the office bathroom without any flourish. I stand to the side and don’t engage in conversation or use the sink too loudly. However, I still wonder if I’m being rude, even if I brush and floss following the rules of discretion.

S. J., Newton

A: I applaud your behavior. Not only are you appropriately addressing a personal grooming issue that we should all work on – keeping your breath fresh and your teeth clean – you’re also doing your brushing in the right place. Instead of thinking of yourself as rude, think of yourself as a role model others in your office would do well to emulate.

Bad breath can be a real relationship killer, both in your personal and your professional life. As soon as someone notices bad breath in another person, the focus goes to that person’s bad breath rather than on what he or she has to say. By brushing your teeth after lunch, you’re giving yourself a leg up on all your colleagues who don’t do anything to keep their breath fresh. Rest assured: You are doing the right thing and setting an excellent example.

For fresh breath all throughout your work day, I recommend the Therabreath travel kit. Great for carrying around.

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Tip of the week

Monday, October 8th, 2007

This week’s tip! Watch out for a fresh breath tip from Dr. Katz every week.

Don’t put off going to the dentist. Don’t wait until you feel pain before you go. It is good to have a check-up every six months.

 

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‘Fitness Phone’ helps users stay healthy, avoid bad breath

Monday, October 8th, 2007

More about the bad breath phone from MSNBC.com.

Updated: 6:11 a.m. PT Oct 3, 2007

TOKYO – Worried that you’re not getting enough exercise or that you’ve eaten way too much garlic? A Japanese firm has come up with a phone that can help.

Japan’s largest cell phone carrier NTT DoCoMo unveiled this week a “Fitness Phone,” designed to help the user stay healthy — and avoid bad breath.

The handheld phone, equipped with various devices that can measure your pulse or the amount of steps you’ve taken in a day, dispenses heath advice after you’ve punched in statistics such as gender, age and weight.

TechWatch: Phat fat phone
TechWatch: Phat fat phone

And you can also exhale into the phone and it will tell you whether its time to reach for the breath mints.

“Our primary target groups would be fat-fighting middle-aged businessmen and young women on diets,” said Kentaro Endo, a spokesman for NTT DoCoMo.

A recent government survey found that on average, Japanese men in their 40s were fatter than they were 12 years ago, mainly due to lack of exercise, while women in the same age group were slimmer because they were more health conscious.

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