Archive for September, 2007

Do You Have a White Tongue or Geographic Tongue? Discover How To Correctly Clean Your Tongue to Make White Tongue Disappear!

Monday, September 10th, 2007
A White Tongue is something that nobody wants to have – not only does a white tongue look abnormal, but left untreated, it’s a strong indication of a breath problem. People who have a condition known as geographic tongue are definitely more likely to experience a white tongue. Geographic Tongue simply means a tongue that has lots of grooves and fissures in it – these grooves and fissures make an excellent breeding ground for the anaerobic bacteria that cause bad breath and a white tongue. The way around this problem is simply making sure that your tongue is kept as clean as possible. But not all tongue cleaning is created equal….Tongue Cleaning (or Tongue Scraping) is a process that the majority of people in the United States don’t do on a daily basis. Yet it’s one of the most important steps you can take to keep your breath clean and fresh.It’s not difficult to do, and it’s not even that particularly time consuming. Yet that extra minute or two per day can reap huge rewards in preventing bad breath, and helping to prevent white tongue and return it to its normal color.A healthy tongue should be slightly moist, smooth, and slightly pinkish in color (see image below left).Under certain conditions, a geographic tongue can become coated, off-color (white, yellow, even black), and dry and cracked (see images below right).

HEALTHY TONGUE: UNHEALTHY, DRY, COATED TONGUES:
 
  Healthy Tongue   White Tongue   Geographic Tongue   Coated Tongue

Let me clarify a few things about tongue cleaning:

 
  1. It’s not necessary to scrape hard
    I’ve seen patients make their tongues bleed because they were pressing down so hard. In general, pressing harder does not remove more bacteria. You simply need to press hard enough so that the tongue cleaner contacts your tongue, flush across the cleaning surface. Try not to leave any gaps.
  2. Tongue Cleaning Alone Does Not Prevent Bad Breath
    Tongue Cleaning does not kill the bacteria that cause bad breath that are breeding below the surface of a geographic tongue. It simply removes the gunk on the surface of your tongue (mucus and food debris) which are a food source for those anaerobic bacteria. In order to get rid of those anaerobic bacteria (which are responsible for white tongue), you must use an oxygenating toothpaste which can penetrate beneath your tongues surface.
  3. It’s not necessary to use one of those complex, expensive gizmos to successfully clean your tongue
    Really, all your need is a fairly rigid instrument, that you can easily make flush with the largest amount possible of your tongues surface area. The electronic tongue cleaners you see can be helpful if you have arthritis, difficulty with coordination, or in general have a tough time performing the actions listed below.
  Recommended Tongue Cleaners:Triple Headed Plastic Tongue Cleaner

 

Step-By-Step Instructions to Successfully Clean A Geographic Tongue and Prevent White Tongue

 
Here is an average tongue cleaning from start to finish from one of my patients who volunteered to allow me to take his picture.

  1. Starting at the very base of your tongue, place the tongue cleaner flush against your tongues surface and make slow sweeping strokes from back-to-front. Start at either side (left or right) and work your way to the other. Depending on the tongue cleaner you are using, you might need to make 3-4 different ‘swaths’ across your tongue.
  2. Once the surface debris from your tongue has been removed, apply a small bead of TheraBreath Oxygenating Toothpaste to the head of your tongue cleaner
  3. Gently coat the suraface of your tongue (as far back as possible without gagging) with the toothpaste. This allows it to penetrate below the surface of your tongue to neutralize those sulfur-producing anaerobic bacteria! There are more bacteria in the rear of your tongue than in the front.
  4. Once your tongue is coated, allow the toothpaste to stay on the surface of your tongue as long as you can. Up to 90 seconds is ideal. If you begin to cough, or your gag reflex kicks in, that’s ok, just spit whenever you need to.
  5. Ideally, it’s best to leave the toothpaste on the surface of your tongue, while you brush your teeth normally.
  White TongueApply TheraBreath ToothpasteGently Scrape TongueHealthy Tongue
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Zinc in TheraBreath PLUS Mouthwash

Monday, September 10th, 2007

Zinc in TheraBreath PLUS Mouthwash

The scientific studies which follow will help explain why TheraBreath PLUS Oral Rinse, in addition to a higher concentration of OXYD-8, also contains Zinc Gluconate. Briefly, science has shown that adding zinc gluconate helps to eliminate sour/bitter/metallic tastes and also aids in reducing tartar buildup. The stabilized chlorine dioxide component (OXYD-8) in TheraBreath PLUS Oral Rinse is utilized to eliminate oral malodor, while Tea Tree Oil assists as a natural anti-microbial.


Biofactors 2000;12(1-4):65-70

Zinc deficiency and taste dysfunction; contribution of carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-metalloenzyme, to normal taste sensation.

by Komai M, Goto T, Suzuki H, Takeda T, Furukawa Y.

Division of Life Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. mkomai@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp

The present study was designed to clarify the effect of zinc deficiency on sodium chloride preference, the lingual trigeminal and taste nerves transduction, and carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity of the tongue surface and salivary gland. Male SD rats, 4 weeks old, were divided into four groups, and fed zinc-deficient (Zn-Def), low-zinc (Low-Zn), and zinc-sufficient diets with free access (Zn-Suf) and pair-feeding (Pair-fed). After taking part in the preference tests for 42 days, the rats were provided for the chorda tympani and lingual trigeminal nerves recordings, then finally sacrificed and the tongue and submandibular gland excised to measure CA activity. Sodium chloride preference increased only after 4 days of the feeding of zinc-deficient and low-zinc diets, which means that the taste abnormality appears abruptly in zinc deficieny and even though in marginal zinc deficiency. Reduced CA activities of the taste-related tissues in zinc-deficient group paralleled well with the decreased taste and lingual trigeminal nerves sensitivities.


Effect of Different Mouthrinses on Morning Breath.

by van Steenberghe D, Avontroodt P, Peeters W, Pauwels M, Coucke W, Lijnen A, Quirynen M.

Department of Periodontology, Oral Pathology and Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.

BACKGROUND: Morning breath odor is an often-encountered complaint. This double-blind, crossover, randomized study aimed to examine the bad breath-inhibiting effect of 3 commercially available mouthrinses on morning halitosis during an experimental period of 12 days without mechanical plaque control.

METHODS: Twelve medical students with a healthy periodontium refrained from all means of mechanical plaque control during 3 experimental periods of 12 days (with intervening washout periods of at least 3 weeks). A professional oral cleaning preceded each period. During each experimental period, as the only oral hygiene measure allowed, the students rinsed twice a day with one of the following formulations in a randomized order: CHX-Alc (a 0.2% chlorhexidine [CHX] solution); CHX-NaF (CHX 0.12% plus sodium fluoride 0.05%); or CHX-CPC-Zn (CHX 0.05% plus cetylpyridinium chloride 0.05% plus zinc lactate 0.14%).

After 12 days, morning breath was scored via volatile sulfur compound (VSC) level measurements of the mouth air and organoleptic ratings of the mouth air, the expired air, and a scraping of the tongue coating. At the 12-day visit, a questionnaire (subjective ratings) was completed and samples taken from both the tongue coating and the saliva for anaerobic and aerobic culturing and vitality staining. The de novo supragingival plaque formation was also recorded. All parameters were correlated with the baseline registrations.

RESULTS: Although oral hygiene during the 3 experimental periods was limited to oral rinses, bad breath parameters systematically improved, with the exception of a slight increase in VSC levels while using CHX-Alc, a finding which was associated with the direct influence of the CHX on the sulfide monitor. The oral microbial load after the use of CHX-NaF remained unchanged, while for the CHX-Alc and CHX-CPC-Zn, significant reductions in both aerobic and anaerobic colony forming units (CFU)/ml were noticed in comparison with baseline data for both tongue coating and saliva samples. The composition of microflora, on the other hand, did not reveal significant changes. The supragingival plaque formation was inhibited, in descending order, by CHX-Alc, CHX-CPC-Zn, and CHX-NaF. The subjective scores for the rinses indicated a higher appreciation for CHX-CPC-Alc and CHX-NaF because of a better taste and fewer side effects. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study demonstrate that morning halitosis can be successfully reduced via daily use of mouthrinses. CHX-Alc and CHX-CPC-Zn mouthrinses result in a significant reduction of the microbial load of tongue and saliva.

Publication Types:
· Clinical Trial
· Randomized Controlled Trial


PMID: 11577950 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

J Clin Periodontol 1996 May;23(5):465-70

The effect of mouth rinses containing zinc and triclosan on plaque accumulation, development of gingivitis and formation of calculus in a 28-week clinical test.

by Schaeken MJ, Van der Hoeven JS, Saxton CA, Cummins D.

Department of Periodontology and Preventive Dentistry, University of Nijmegan, The Netherlands.

Experimental mouthrinses containing 0.4% zinc sulphate and 0.15% triclosan, which differed in base formulations were compared to a commercially available non-active control mouthrinse. Following baseline clinical examinations for plaque, gingival bleeding and calculus, the volunteers were provided with a dental prophylaxis and given oral hygiene instruction, stratified into 3 groups and given 1 of 3 mouthrinses.

Further clinical assessments were performed after 4, 16 and 28 weeks. Salivary mutans streptococci were also monitored during the study. At 4 weeks, plaque and calculus scores in all groups were low compared to baseline. During the remainder of the study, these improvements were not maintained and both plaque and calculus levels increased in all groups. Plaque was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than in the control at all time points. Calculus was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than in the control at all time points. Calculus was significantly lower at week 28 for experimental mouthrinse group 2. Gingival bleeding also decreased in the initial 4 weeks but increased thereafter in the control group. In contrast, gingival bleeding was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the two experimental groups than in the control group. No significant changes in mutans streptococci were observed.


Ann Pharmacother 1996 Feb;30(2):186-7
Zinc Deficiency and Taste Disorders.

by Heyneman CA.

Idaho Drug Information Center, Idaho State University, Pocatello 83209, USA.

Elemental zinc supplementation in daily dosages of 25-100 mg po appears to be an efficacious treatment for taste dysfunction secondary to zinc depletion. Insufficient evidence is available to determine the efficacy of zinc supplementation for the treatment of hypogeusia or dysgeusia secondary to drug therapy or medical conditions that do not involve low serum zinc concentrations.


Ther Umsch 1995 Nov;52(11):732-7

[Article in German] Huttenbrink KB.

Klinik und Poliklinik fur Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde der Medizinischen Fakultat Carl Gustav Carus, Technischen Universitat Dresden.

Disorders of olfaction and taste are infrequent, but a complete loss of smell or taste reduces the quality of life significantly. The sensitivity of human olfaction is remarkable, even for specific stimuli: Just a few molecules are enough to induce the correct identification of sterilised and ultraheated milk.

Olfaction and taste are called ‘chemical senses’ because in both cases the adequate stimulus consists of molecules that bind to receptors of the sensory cells. The perceptions of smell and taste are often combined. Taste differentiates only four qualities: sweet, sour, salty, and bitter. The typical flavor of food or drink is detected by olfaction. Disturbances of olfaction can be due to respiratory disorders such as nasal polyps, a deviation of the nasal septum or chronic sinusitis. Such conditions can reduce airflow through the olfactory cleft at the roof of the nasal cavity. They can be corrected by modern endoscopic surgery of the nose.

Epithelial disorders involving the sensory cells are most often caused by viral infections (influenza-anosmia) or toxic destruction of the sensory epithelium (solvents or gases). Epithelial disorders can be cured only rarely by any treatment. Corticosteroids, zinc, and vitamin A are tried frequently. Neural disorders occur after frontobasal trauma and during neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease. Disorders of olfaction can be an early sign of such neurological diseases and sophisticated examination of this sense can contribute to their early diagnosis. However, no specific treatments have yet been identified. Disorders of taste can be due to toxic, chemical or inflammatory damage to the sensory cells of the tongue.


Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 1993 Oct;37(4):318-22

Zinc Taste Test in Pregnant Women and its Correlation with Serum Zinc Level.

by Garg HK, Singal KC, Arshad Z.

Department of Pharmacology, J. N. Medical College, A.M.U., Aligarh.

Pregnant women in different trimesters of pregnancy were divided into control (n = 58) and study (n = 104) groups. Study group subjects were given 45 mg zinc/p.o./day as 200 mg ‘zinc sulphate tablets from the day of reporting till term. Body zinc status was clinically assessed by ‘zinc taste test’. Blood samples were drawn at the same time and serum zinc levels measured. Zinc taste test scores decreased with advancement of pregnancy (P < 0.05) and increased significantly following zinc administration (P < 0.05).

Serum zinc level declined significantly with advancement of pregnancy (P < 0.001). Following zinc administration, serum zinc level increased significantly (P < 0.001). Accuracy of zinc taste test in individual cases ranged between 70 and 100 percent. On the whole, zinc taste test was well correlated with serum zinc level, and provides a fair idea of zinc deficiency.


Nutrition 1993 May-Jun;9(3):218-24

Zinc deficiency in elderly patients.

by AS, Fitzgerald JT, Hess JW, Kaplan J, Pelen F, Dardenne M. – Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI.

Zinc is needed for growth and development, DNA synthesis, neurosensory functions, and cell-mediated immunity. Although zinc intake is reduced in elderly people, its deficiency and effects on cell-mediated immunity of the elderly have not been established. Subjects enrolled in “A Model Health Promotion and Intervention Program for Urban Middle Aged and Elderly Americans” were assessed for nutrition and zinc status. One hundred eighty healthy subjects were randomly selected for the study. Their mean dietary zinc intake was 9.06 mg/day, whereas the recommended dietary allowance is 15 mg/day. Plasma zinc was normal, but zinc in granulocytes and lymphocytes were decreased compared with younger control subjects. Of 118 elderly subjects in whom zinc levels in both granulocytes and lymphocytes were available, 36 had deficient levels.

Plasma copper was increased, and interleukin 1 (IL-1) production was significantly decreased. Reduced response to the skin-test antigen panel and decreased taste acuity were observed. Thirteen elderly zinc-deficient subjects were supplemented with zinc, and various variables were assessed before and after zinc supplementation. Zinc supplementation corrected zinc deficiency and normalized plasma copper levels. Serum thymulin activity, IL-1 production, and lymphocyte ecto-5′-nucleotidase increased significantly after supplementation. Improvement in response to skin-test antigens and taste acuity was observed after zinc supplementation. A mild zinc deficiency appears to be a significant clinical problem in free-living elderly people.


Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1991 May;117(5):519-28

Smell and taste disorders, a study of 750 patients from the University of Pennsylvania Smell and Taste Center.

Deems DA, Doty RL, Settle RG, Moore-Gillon V, Shaman P, Mester AF, Kimmelman CP, Brightman VJ, Snow JB Jr. – Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Human Communication, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Smell and taste disorders are common in the general population, yet little is known about their nature or cause. This article describes a study of 750 patients with complaints of abnormal smell or taste perception from the University of Pennsylvania Smell and Taste Center, Philadelphia. Major findings suggest that: chemosensory dysfunction influences quality of life; complaints of taste loss usually reflect loss of smell function; upper respiratory infection, head trauma, and chronic nasal and paranasal sinus disease are the most common causes of the diminution of the sense of smell, with head trauma having the greatest loss; depression frequently accompanies chemosensory distortion; low body weight accompanies burning mouth syndrome; estrogens protect against loss of the sense of smell in postmenopausal women; zinc therapy may provide no benefit to patients with chemosensory dysfunction; and thyroid hormone function is associated with oral sensory distortion. The findings are discussed in relation to management of patients with chemosensory disturbances.


J Periodontol 1990 Jun;61(6):352-8

Clinical efficacy of a dentifrice and oral rinse containing sanguinaria extract and zinc chloride during 6 months of use.

Harper DS, Mueller LJ, Fine JB, Gordon J, Laster LL. – Fairleigh-Dickinson University, Oral Health Research Center, Hackensack, NJ.

The efficacy of combined use of toothpaste and oral rinse containing sanguinaria extract and zinc chloride was compared to placebo products in a 6-month clinical trial. Sixty subjects with moderate levels of plaque and gingivitis were randomly assigned to active and placebo groups. Noninvasive measures of plaque and gingivitis were assessed at baseline and at 2, 6, 8, 14, 20, and 28 weeks. Bleeding on probing was measured at baseline and 6, 14, and 28 weeks. Active group scores were significantly lower (P less than .0001) than placebo scores at each post-baseline time point for all indices, with the exception of plaque at 2 weeks. The 28 week active group scores were 21% lower than the placebo group for plaque, 25% lower for gingivitis, and 43% lower for bleeding on probing. No dental staining or taste alteration was reported in the active group. Three of 30 active group subjects exhibited minor soft tissue irritations that resolved spontaneously without discontinuation of product use. Results indicate that the test products showed good levels of safety and efficacy when administered in a combined use regimen for 6 months.


Clin Prev Dent 1990 Apr-May;12(1):13-7

Clinical evaluation of anticalculus dentifrices.

Kazmierczak M, Mather M, Ciancio S, Fischman S, Cancro L.

One hundred and eighty-seven patients participated in a six-month study to evaluate the calculus-inhibiting effect of a zinc citrate dentifrice compared to Crest Tartar Control and a placebo, Crest Regular. The findings demonstrate a statistically significant calculus prevention benefit over Crest Regular for both Crest Tartar Control and a 2% zinc citrate/silica product. Compared to the control, the zinc citrate product reduced calculus formation by 32.3%, and Crest Tartar Control reduced it by 21.4%. These findings also demonstrate no statistically significant difference in stain or soft tissue status among the three dentifrices. All products were found to be safe to oral tissues and acceptable for taste.

J La State Med Soc 1989 Sep;141(9):9-11

Disorders of taste.

Rareshide E, Amedee RG.

At least 2 million Americans suffer with chemosensory dysfunction or disorders of taste and smell. In addition to the obvious aesthetic deprivation, loss of taste may affect an individual’s health and psychosocial situation. Most taste disorders are associated with antecedent upper respiratory infection, trauma, or allergic rhinitis, or have an idiopathic etiology. They may reflect underlying neoplastic, neurologic, endocrine, infectious, or nutritional disturbances; only 1% of these patients have a functional disorder. Evaluation consists of a history and physical, followed by a screening test battery searching for any of the treatable etiologies. One third of patients will respond to exogenous zinc therapy after a treatment period of 2 to 4 months. The remainder must rely on supportive measures such as additives, flavor enhancers, and rinses.

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Medications Which May Lead to Bad Breath

Monday, September 10th, 2007

Many people are unaware that the medications that they’ve been taking for years have actually contributed to their bad breath and taste disorder. It all boils down to the unfortunate side-effects of many medications which include dry mouth and alteration in taste perception.

According to the most recent research on prescription medications, 7 out of the top 10 medications used in the US during 1998 had “dry mouth, bad breath, or taste disorders” as a side effect.

We have compiled the following list for you, along with a list of other common medication that you may be taking:

Medication

Use

Dry Mouth
Sour Taste Symptom
Listed.

Notes

bad breath and halitosis

Other Common medications are part of this problem also. This is only a partial list. Please consult your physician before altering the prescribed use of any of these medications.

bad breath and halitosis

ANOREXIANT
Adipex-P, Fastin, Ionamin, Zantryl ……phentermine
Anorex SR, Adipost, Bontril PDM……..phendimetrazine
Mazanor, Sanorex …………………………… mazindol
Pondimin, Fen-Phen …………………………fenfluramine
Tenuate, Tepanil, Ten-Tab ……………….diethylpropion

ANTIACNE
Accutane …………………………………………. isotretinoin

ANTIANXIETY
Atarax, Vistaril …………………………………. hydroxyzine
Ativan ……………………………………………….. lorazepam
Centrax …………………………………………….. prazepam
Equanil, Miltown ……………………………….. meprobamate
Librium ……………………………………………… chlordiazepoxide
Paxipam ……………………………………………. halazepam
Serax ………………………………………………… oxazepam
Valium ………………………………………………. diazepam
Xanax ………………………………………………… alprazolam

ANTICHOLINERGIC / ANTISPASMODIC
Anaspaz …………………………………………….. hyoscyamine
Atropisol. Sal-Tropine ……………………….. atropine
Banthine …………………………………………….. methantheline
Bellergal …………………………………………….. belladonna alkaloids
Bentyl …………………………………………………. dicyclomine
Daricon ………………………………………………. oxyphencyclimine
Ditropan ……………………………………………… oxybutynin
Donnatal, Kinesed ……..hyoscyamine with atropine,phenobarbital, scopolamine
Librax ………………………………………………….. chlordiazepoxide with clidinium
Pamine ………………………………………………… methscopolamine
Pro-Banthine ……………………………………….. propantheline
Transderm-Scop …………………………………. scopolamine

ANTICONVULSANT
Felbatol …………………………………………. felbamate
Lamictal ………………………………………… lamotrigine
Neurontin ………………………………………. gabapentin
Tegretol …………………………………………. carbamazepine

ANTIDEPRESSANTb
Anafranil ………………………………………. clomipramine
Asendin ………………………………………… amoxapine
Elavil …………………………………………….. amitryptaline
Luvox ……………………………………………. fluvoxamine
Norpramin …………………………………….. desipramine
Prozac ………………………………………….. fluoxetine
Sinequan ………………………………………. doxepin
Tofranil ………………………………………….. imipramine
Wellbutrin ……………………………………… bupropion

ANTIDIARRHETIC
Imodium AD …………………………………… loperamide
Lomotil …………………………………………….diphenoxylate with atropine
Motofen ………………………………………….. difenoxin with atropine

ANTIHISTAMINE
Actifed ……………………………………………. triprolidine with pseudoephedrine
Benadryl ………………………………………… diphenhydramine
Chlor-Trimeton ………………………………. chlorpheniramine
Claritin ……………………………………………. loratadine
Dimetane ……………………………………….. brompheniramine
Dimetapp……………..brompheniramine with phenylpropanolamine
Hismanal …………………………………………. astemizole
Phenergan ……………………………………….. promethazine
Pyribenzamine (PBZ) ………………………. tripelennamine
Seldane ……………………………………………. terfenadine

ANTIHYPERTENSIVE
Capoten ………………………………………. captopril
Catapres …………………………………….. clonidine
Coreg ………………………………………….. carvedilol
Ismelin ………………………………………… guanethidine
Minipress …………………………………….. prazosin
Serpasil ……………………………………….. reserpine
Wytensin ……………………………………… guanabenz

ANTIINFLAMMATORY ANALGESIC
Dolobid ………………………………………….. diflunisal
Feldene ………………………………………….. piroxicam
Motrin, Advil …………………………………… ibuprofen
Nalfon …………………………………………….. fenoprofen
Naprosyn ……………………………………….. naproxen

ANTINAUSEANT/ANTIEMETIC
Antivert ……………………………………… meclizine
Dramamine ………………………………. dyphenhydramine
Marezine …………………………………… cyclizine

ANTIPARKINSONIAN
Akineton …………………………………….. biperiden
Artane ………………………………………… trihexyphenidyl
Cogentin …………………………………….. benztropine mesylate
Larodopa …………………………………….. levodopa
Sinemet ………………………………………. carbidopa with levodopa

ANTI-PSYCHOTIC
Clozaril …………………………………………… clozapine
Compazine …………………………………….. prochlorperazine
Eskalith …………………………………………… lithium
Haldol …………………………………………….. haloperidol
Mellaril ……………………………………………. thioridazine
Navane ……………………………………………. thiothixene
Orap ………………………………………………… pimozide
Sparine ……………………………………………. promazine
Stelazine …………………………………………. trifluoperazine
Thorazine ………………………………………… chlorpromazine

BRONCHDILATOR
Atrovent ………………………………………. ipratropium
Isuprel …………………………………………. isoproterenol
Proventil, Ventolin ……………………….. albuterol

DECONGESTANT
Ornade …….. phenylpropanolamine with chlorpheniramine
Sudafed ………………………………………… pseudoephedrine

DIURETIC
Diuril ……………………………………………… chlorothiazide
Dyazide, Maxzide …… triamterine and hydrochlorothiazide
HydroDIURIL, Esidrix …………………… hydrochlorothiazide
Hygroton ……………………………………….. chlorthalidone
Lasix ……………………………………………… furosemide
Midamor ………………………………………… amiloride

MUSCLE RELAXANT
Flexeril ………………………………………… cyclobenzaprine
Lioresal ……………………………………….. baclofen
Norflex, Disipal ……………………………. orphenadrine

NARCOTIC ANALGESIC
Demerol ………………………………………… meperidine
MS Contin …………………………………….. morphine

SEDATIVE
Dalmane ………………………………………. flurazepam
Halcion ………………………………………… triazolam
Restoril ………………………………………… temazepam

bad breath and halitosis

ANTIDEPRESSANTS
Prozac Norpramin Pertofrane
Elavil Adapin Valium (occassionally)
Imavate SK-Pramine Tofranil
Aventyl Vivactil Zoloft
Paxil Sigequan

ANTIPARKINSONISM
Akineton Artane Laradopa
Parsidol

ANTIHISTAMINES (Cold Medications)
Actifed Benadryl Comtrex
Dimetapp Pheran Triaminic
Vistaril Historal

ANTIHYPERTENSIVES (High Blood Pressure Medication):
Beta Blockers, Diuretics, Anti-Coagulants
Rautensin Isemelin Aldomet
Serpasil Minipress Inversine
Hyperoid Catapres Inderal
Inderide Aquatensin Moderatic
Diazide

ANTISPASMODICS & ANTICHOLINERGICS (GASTROINTESTINAL TYPE)
Quarzan Vistrax Combid
Pro-Banthine Anaspaz PB Donnatal
Pathibate

ANTISPASMODICS & ANTICHOLINERGICS (URINARY TYPE)
Pyridium Cystospaz Ditropan
Urispas Trac-Tabs

ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS
Haldol Rau-Sed Serpasil
Thorazine Stelazine Comazine
Moban Daxolin Lithane
Lithonate

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Frequently Asked Questions

Monday, September 10th, 2007
Why doesn’t my dentist or physician know about this treatment?
The information is out there in many microbiology and dental journals. If your health care professional were interested in treating you, I’m sure they would have taken the time to look for this research.In fact, I will soon be entering the 8th year of performing this treatment, and just recently, The American Dental Association finally agreed with what I have been saying all this time…”Bad breath originates on the back of the tongue and in the throat.” This differs from the disinformation that they initially put out back in 1995 when the Sacramento Bee wrote about my clinical treatment. They attempted to “disqualify” my patient successes and instead urged the public to use ADA approved products which contain high levels of Alcohol, SOAP (Sodium Lauryl Sulfate) and Saccharin. The ADA Seal of Approval is no assurance that an oral product will assist your bad breath problem. In fact, the ADA has ignored the entire problem of Halitosis and has classified it as “cosmetic”. A very sad state of affairs from an organization that was intended to help the public.

One last story on this topic. In early 1997 I appeared on TV in Detroit, where I received nearly 700 phone calls about The TheraBreath System. One of the callers was a dentist in a Detroit suburb, whose young daughter had a bad breath problem. The dentist tried the TheraBreath products the young girl and called the next day to tell me that it worked like a miracle. When I asked the dentist if she were interested in providing TheraBreath to her own patients, she told me that she couldn’t because my products did not have an ADA Seal of Approval, however, she uses the products for her daughter! The reason: She was afraid of pressure from the ADA, of which she was a member, if she would provide non-ADA seal products to her patients!

 
No. That’s because the anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria that create bad breath live and breed within the back of the tongue and in the throat. They have the ability to digest mucous (because of high protein content) & then break it down into sulfide molecules, which cause the bad breath & bitter, sour taste. The correct way to fight bad breath due to post nasal drip is to use a combination of our TheraBreath Nasal Sinus Drops and AktivOxigen tablets, creating an oxygenating solution to cleanse the throat and tonsil area.
 
No. Almost all commercial toothpaste’s contain Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SOAP), placed in toothpaste in order to create a foaming action, so that you think that something is actually happening. It has no beneficial effects at all. Unfortunately it will also inhibit the potency of the active ingredients. That is why those who use Oxyfresh toothpaste should read the ingredients in their toothpaste: It contains Sodium Lauryl Sulfate! This will negate the benefits of the oxidation process.
 
The only way to effectively stop these bacteria from producing these Volatile Sulfur Compounds, is to use an Oxyd-8 based product. No other compounds will perform this action. The bacteria reproduce every 10-12 hours and that is why the treatment must be done throughout the day. After several months, there is a residual effect, whereby the medication has a longer lasting feeling. Some patients are then able to get by with performing the procedure only twice daily, however, for the best results, most perform the procedures three times daily.Many patients use between 2-3 bottles of rinse per month. A large toothpaste lasts about 5-6 weeks. If you stop, the problems will come back again, because the bacteria will recognize the difference within a few days. The products were designed to become your daily oral hygiene system and now with tooth whitening (TheraBrite) and periodontal treatments (PerioTherapy) as part of our entire system, you’ll never need to use other products. By the way, most people spend less than $1 per day to maintain their fresh breath and taste.
 
Those little round globules are known as Tonsiloliths and they are most definitely related to Halitosis and sour taste. They are created by sulfur gases produced by these bacteria (which are located across from the tonsils in the throat area). The sulfur gas mixes with the mucous and thick saliva in the back of your throat and after a period of time, condense into these concentrated, odorous globs. They are only present when one has tonsils, but not in all cases.I have had many patients who have actually had their tonsils removed due to misinformation from physicians about this problem. Of course, these patients still had bad breath after having the tonsillectomy, because BAD BREATH DOES NOT START IN THE TONSILS! (only on the back of the tongue). However, it can branch off into the tonsils, secondarily.

Important: To reduce Halitosis (if you have Tonsiloliths) here’s what my patients tell me they have done to solve this problem:

Swallow 1-2 capfuls of the solution created with the AktivOxigen tablets, before bedtime. They say that it feels as if the odor and lousy taste are neutralized as the Rinse solution passes the tonsil area.

 
Now, that’s a good question! In my opinion, and based on helping tens of thousands of people who have suffered with bad breath, tongue scraping by itself is NOT the answer. In fact, I have seen dozens of cases in my clinics where people have just scraped too hard and for too long, resulting in damage..painful tongue, dry tongue, and burning tongue!We prefer to use the tongue cleaner as an application device with a very gentle cleansing motion on the tongue from the back to the front. This helps to apply the TheraBreath gel below the tongue’s surface to where the bacteria actually live. The Bacteria cannot live ON the tongue surface…Remember they are anaerobes and by definition, they can’t survive on the surface.
 
You will find an order form for our products enclosed with your first order or when you come to see us. Just fill it out and send it to us (or fax it to us at 323-933-1317) and you should receive your order within 7-10 working days, depending on where you live. We have been shipping these medications all over the world (to 59 countries at last count). And most importantly, any improvements in our treatment, any significant research on these topics, and any information on the enhancement in these products will be sent to you immediately.We have been fortunate to now have our basic TheraBreath products in thousands of s tores across the U.S. (Walgreens, Eckerd, Genovese, selected GNC stores, Meijer stores, Wegmans, Price-Chopper, Kinney Drug, and more)
 
TheraBreath PLUS contains a great combination of anti-microbial agents as well as components that are great for oral health in general. The products in the PLUS line include Oral Rinse, Toothpaste, Spray, PowerDrops, and Gum.
 
I would recommend the PerioTherapy line of Oral Rinse and Toothpaste. It’s similar to the TheraBreath PLUS line, but focuses more on gum health, which is still the number one oral disease in the world – more of a problem than cavities by far! And because chronic gum disease can lead to other health problems, such as heart attacks, strokes, pneumonia, and birth problems for pregnant women, we highly recommend PerioTherapy products.
 
Simply put, you can’t give bad breath to someone else. The bacteria that create this problem are actually good bacteria and are part of the normal oral flora (the mix of bacteria that you need to function properly). It’s possible that the bacteria in your boyfriend’s mouth (tongue, throat, tonsils) are reacting to his dry mouth, which could have been created by smoking, medication, or alcohol (in beer and wine). Tell him about TheraBreath and both of you will soon be able to kiss with confidence.
 
You are not imagining anything. There are odors that can be detected in some cases as they emanate from the nostrils. This type of odor is due to mucous in the nasal passage and its reaction to bacteria in the nostrils (not in the sinus). It may also be a by-product of the reaction between mucous, post nasal drip, or allergies in the area beyond the sinus (in the naso-pharyngeal area and the throat/tonsil area). The solution is quite simple – TheraBreath Nasal Sinus Drops are the only oxygenating/zinc formula to attack this type of problem.
 
Actually, our TheraBrite toothpaste is BOTH a whitening toothpaste AND a breath toothpaste. Just use it in conjunction with any of our oxygenating rinses – TheraBreath, AktivOxigen, TheraBreath PLUS, and PerioTherapy – All of our products are designed to work together.
 
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See for yourself if your breath is offensive!

Monday, September 10th, 2007

How can I test my own breath?

Good question. It is impossible to smell your own breath by cupping your hand up to your nose and smelling. (All you do is smell your hand.)

Your body is designed in such a manner, that you cannot detect your own odor this way. It’s a human process called Acclimation, which is necessary so that we are able to smell other things besides ourselves.

There are 3 ways to check if your breath is offensive:

1. At the California Breath Clinics, through the use of the Halimeter, which measures the concentration of Sulfides in your breath.

2. At home, by using The Bad Breath Detective – a scientifically based home test for bad breath, which measures the amount of sulfur coming from your tongue by simply swabbing the back of your tongue and placing into the test tube that comes with the Bad Breath Detective. Costs as little as $10 per test.

3. A few quick home tests, which will give you a good indication if your breath offends – and costs you nothing (not as accurate as 1 and 2 above). Here they are:

Here are a few good ways to test your own breath at home:

1. Wipe the top surface of your tongue with a piece of cotton gauze and smell that. (That’s probably the most honest way.) Furthermore, if you notice a yellowish stain on the cotton, it’s likely that you have an elevated sulfide production level.

2. Lick the back of your hand. Let that dry for about 10 seconds and then smell. If you notice an odor, you have a breath disorder because the sulfur salts from your tongue have been transferred to your hand.

3. Run a piece of dental floss between your back teeth (especially where you may get food caught) and then smell the floss. This may be an indication of the level of odors others may detect.

4. Stand in front of the mirror and stick your tongue out as far as possible. If you notice that the very back of your tongue is whitish, it may be a sign that you have bad breath. Also, you can judge the reaction from others. Our patients tell us that they are no longer offered gum and mints and people no longer step away from them. It has significantly changed their confidence and improved their lives.

5. Ask the opinion of someone you can trust. Ask them to check your breath several times daily because breath changes throughout the day.

6. If certain foods alter your taste, it is a good sign that sulfur compounds are being produced. This usually happens after using Alcohol based mouthwashes, eating dairy foods, drinking alcoholic beverages, or after eating sugary products (Altoids, candy, Pepsi, etc.)

If any of the tests above prove positive (you notice an offensive odor or taste, you may want to answer our clinical questionnaire, which will further assist you in your search for fresh breath and taste).

7. Of course, as I mentioned before, there are more accurate methods, the most accurate being the Halimeter. This is an instrument which measures the concentration of Sulfide molecules in one’s breath and/or saliva. The border line number for fresh breath vs. bad breath is about 75 ppb (parts per billion) according to Dr. Yaegaki who published the definitive article on these values. In our clinics, we have used these guidelines on thousands of patients. We have also demonstrated the use of this sensitive instrument on TV stations across the US, Europe, and Asia.

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