Archive for September, 2007

Season of mists, mellow fruitfulness and halitosis

Thursday, September 27th, 2007

Mark Steyn makes a short commentary in The National Review on yet another new piece of bad breath information by Dr. Harold Katz. (09/27 08:15 AM)

You learn something every day. I just got a press release headlined “Foul Fall Bad Breath Season Is Here”. Apparently, according to the world’s foremost bad breath expert, Dr. Harold Katz of the California Breath Clinics, this affliction is seasonal:

“As the temperatures drop and more time is spent inside, people with bad breath have nowhere to safely exhale.”

This sounds like something we need Congressional hearings on. In a low-ceilinged windowless room.

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Someone needs a mint – A news bit on Dr. Katz

Thursday, September 27th, 2007

Barry Fox of The Patriot News writes about Dr. Katz and bad breath.

Tuesday September 25, 2007, 5:41 PM

Halitosis is perhaps the least talked about plagues on humanity.

Better known as bad breath it’s the scourge of any close talking situation.

WGAL-TV Channel 8, however, provides hope with a lengthy report on how icky bacteria breeding in your mouth are conspiring against you.

If you’re a sufferer, the American Dental Association is an excellent source of help.

And, if you’re looking for the freshest breath in America – as determined by dentist-bacteriologist Harold Katz, the author of “The Bad Breath Bible,” and a device he calls the “Halimeter” — look no further than Columbus, Ohio.

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Fit: Every Breath You Take – Dr. Katz in Columbus, Ohio

Thursday, September 27th, 2007

Dr. Katz, who is on a nationwide “bad breath mission tour” gets down to the basics of bad breath with Vicky Hallett of Read Express.

IF YOU’RE LOOKING for someone to kiss, try the streets of Columbus, Ohio. That’s what dentist-bacteriologist Harold Katz says, anyway. Armed with a device called a Halimeter, the author of “The Bad Breath Bible” is touring the nation to give out gold stars or break the news that, yes, that odor is completely offensive. The current standings have the Midwestern city as the country’s fresh-breath front-runner. To prepare our city for his impending arrival (although the date isn’t scheduled yet), Katz has some tips on making mouths more fragrant.

» EXPRESS: Are people aware of how stinky their breath is?
» KATZ: No, people don’t know they have bad breath. Their brains get used to their odors.

» EXPRESS: So, what causes bad breath?
» KATZ: A dry mouth is the number one cause. People don’t drink enough water to replenish their saliva, and many mouthwashes are full of alcohol, which just dries mouths out more. The teeth have very little to do with it — it comes from bacteria in the back of the throat. The odor you smell in bad breath comes from anaerobic sulphur-producing bacteria, so it stays away from oxygen.

» EXPRESS: But can’t you scrape your tongue?
» KATZ: That does help somewhat, but people who use traditional toothpaste to do it are making their tongues dry, and you don’t want to keep the tongue dry.

» EXPRESS: Garlic can impact breath, but are any foods surprising?
» KATZ: We recommend that if you go to a party that you look for things that are juicy, like fruits. Dairy foods are a big problem because they contain proteins that can break down and smell.

» EXPRESS: Do breath mints help?
» KATZ: Not much, especially if it contains sugar. The way you grow bacteria in a lab is to give it sugar.

» EXPRESS: I hear you’ve worked with celebrities. Any good stories?
» KATZ: I can’t name names, but I treated a singer who had a lounge act. The people at the front tables would go to the back of the room. Also, smokers and drinkers end up with bad breath, so actors have major issues with kissing scenes.

» EXPRESS: How do you politely tell someone they have foul breath?
» KATZ: We have a tell-a-friend program [on the Web site Therabreath.com]. They’ll get an e-mail explaining what bad breath is all about. We’re not here to insult them.

» EXPRESS: Can bad breath be a sign of something more than dry mouth?
» KATZ: Quite often we talk about this as a funny thing, but there’s a strong link to illness when you have those high levels of sulphur. It means you’re susceptible to gum disease. Once gums are puffy and bleeding, that’s a chronic infection. There’s a higher incidence of heart attacks and strokes. Signs that things are out of balance could lead to serious consequences.

» EXPRESS: Any other breath-freshening tips for our readers?
» KATZ: Drinking a six-pack of beer is not the same as drinking water. And we highly recommend flossing. It’s one of these things people avoid, but in those crevices is where the bacteria are hiding from oxygen. Also, certain medications — anti-histamines, anti-depressants — can make the mouth dry. So, people who never had bad breath might get it with a new prescription.

» EXPRESS: I know you haven’t tested D.C. breath yet, but any thoughts on how politicians will do?
» KATZ: People who talk a lot use up their saliva, and their breath starts to become offensive. So, if they want to get votes, they should drink plenty of water on the campaign trail.

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Bad Breath: You Are What You Eat – Dr. Katz interviewed by WGAL news

Thursday, September 27th, 2007

Expert: Odor Sticks Around Until Food Leaves System

This piece comes to us from Michele Biaso of WGAL news in Lancaster, PA, who recently interviewed Dr Katz about the relationship of what you eat and how your breath smells.

Michele Biaso, Staff writer

There you are in the office, sitting down for a meeting when something catches your attention.

It’s the girl from accounting sitting next to you. You are convinced she ate a raw onion on her lunch break. She has no idea that the slice of onion in the pita wrap she ate an hour ago is causing people in the meeting to slowly scoot their chairs farther away.

Halitosis — or bad breath — is more common than people think.

Dr. Harold Katz said one-third of the population suffers from bad breath and some don’t even know it.

“That’s because you can’t smell your own breath,” he said, adding that your brain gets used to your own odor, a process called acclimation.

Katz, founder of California Breath Clinics, said the foods you consume play a direct role in odors you emit from your mouth.

open-mouth.jpg According to the American Dental Association, mouth odors will continue until the body eliminates the food. So from the time you take a bite of that garlic bagel, it becomes absorbed in the bloodstream, gets transferred to the lungs and is then expelled you give off a scent.

Obvious foods such as garlic, onions and curry can directly cause bad breath because they contain sulfur compounds, which is what people smell in bad breath. But Katz said there are less obvious foods that can make your breath clear a room.

Feeding Bacteria In The Mouth

One bad breath myth he wants to debunk is that bad breath comes from the stomach.

In almost every case, he said, a smelly mouth is caused by bacteria that breed beneath the surface of the tongue, throat and tonsils.

Some foods play an indirect role because they provide fuel for the anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria that produce chronic halitosis, he said.

Katz said dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt can also cause breath problems.

“They contain dense proteins that these nasty bacteria use as a fuel source to create odors,” he said.

What you drink is also important in keeping your breath fresh.

Coffee is a problem because it is very acidic. Katz said bacteria love an acidic environment because they can reproduce faster.

Candy and gum that contain sugar are also major problems because sugar feeds the bacteria. And Katz doesn’t recommend adult beverages either, because alcohol makes the mouth dry, allowing the bacteria to breed.

Those cutting calories should also be careful.

“When one diets, saliva is diminished so there is less natural protection,” Katz said. Also, when the body also starts to break down stored fats, which Katz said can lead to a different kind of bad breath.

Body builders are notorious for this problem because of their high intake of whey protein, which they use to bulk up muscle. Whey protein contains high concentrations of amino acids that contain high amounts of sulfur.

“High-protein diets are a problem because the bacteria create odors by breaking down amino acids in proteins. Then they excrete sulfur compounds as their ‘poop,'” he said.

Water Washes Away Stink

Katz said the best thing people can do to keep their breath fresh is to drink six to eight glasses of water per day. Drinking tea is also a good idea, he said.

Saliva is nature’s way of keeping your breath fresh.

“Saliva contains a high percentage of oxygen, which is the natural enemy of anaerobic bacteria,” he said. “The more saliva, the fresher your breath.”

Katz said foods that contain a lot of water also help. Celery, cucumbers, grapes, zucchini and carrots all have high water content.

Foods that are juicy, such as watermelons and strawberries, also ward off bacteria because they encourage saliva production.

If you can’t stay way from the garlic, onions and other stench-creating foods, Katz said to use an oxygenating mouthwash and toothpaste.

Katz, creator of TheraBreath System formulas, said oxygen compounds in the mouthwash and toothpaste attach themselves to the sulfur compounds and create a non-odorous compound.

therakit.jpg

Mouthwashes that contain alcohol defeat the purpose by creating a dry mouth, Katz said.

Breakfast Important To Odor

One thing Katz recommends is to eat breakfast every day. He said people who skip breakfast tend to have horrible breath because a morning meal stimulates saliva production immediately.

“When one sleeps, there is no saliva production. So, you literally have a sulfur factory in your mouth for seven to eight hours since there is no natural saliva or oxygen to fight the anaerobic bacteria.”

And as your dentist has been telling you since your first visit, brushing your teeth is always a great defense.

According to the ADA, food can collect between the teeth, on the tongue and around the gums. It can then rot, causing an unpleasant odor.

If you don’t brush and floss daily, particles of food remain in the mouth and collect bacteria. This can contribute to halitosis.

In most cases, Katz said, the food you eat will not make you smell bad forever.

“Once saliva kicks in, most people return to fresh breath,” he said.

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Dog Breath?

Monday, September 10th, 2007

It could mean that Your “best friend” may have a serious problem. Periodontal Disease is the #1 disease in dogs and bad breath is one sign that your dog may be suffering. Now, there is a way to attack it naturally and effectively. Plus, we introduce the 1st Deodorizing Shampoo for Dogs using Oxygenation which stops offensive odors, attacks fleasand ticks & soothes your dog’s coat.

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